Latest Wildlife management News

In this June 14, 2019 photo, a four-wheeler is ridden through Arctic Village, Alaska. If the pandemic has deepened the sense of isolation for the 8,000 or so Gwich’in, sprinkled across northeastern Alaska into Canada, it has also emphasized the importance of the tribe’s traditions and its profound spiritual connection to the homelands that sustain the caribou and other wildlife on which they depend. (Brian Adams/Religion News Service via AP)

Shunning virus and Big Oil, Alaska tribe revives traditions

Jun. 2, 2020 4:15 PM EDT

ARCTIC VILLAGE, Alaska (RNS) — Arriving home on one of the last regular flights before pandemic restrictions went into effect in mid-February, Sarah James got to her house to find two caribous worth of meat in her freezer. Since flights have become intermittent to this indigenous village 100 miles north of...

6 elephants killed by poachers in single day in Ethiopia

Jun. 2, 2020 6:25 AM EDT

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — At least six elephants were killed in a single day by poachers in Ethiopia last week, wildlife officials said, the largest such slaughter in memory in the East African nation. “The elephants were killed while they ventured out of the Mago National Park to drink...

In this April 2014 photo provided by the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre at the University of Saskatchewan, a researcher holds a ferret at their facility in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. In 2020, the lab is working with 300 ferrets developing a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine candidate and testing other vaccine candidates and therapeutics. (VIDO-InterVac at the University of Saskatchewan via AP)

Monkeys, ferrets offer needed clues in COVID-19 vaccine race

Jun. 2, 2020 5:30 AM EDT

The global race for a COVID-19 vaccine boils down to some critical questions: How much must the shots rev up someone’s immune system to really work? And could revving it the wrong way cause harm? Even as companies recruit tens of thousands of people for larger vaccine studies this summer, behind the...

Wildlife managers use pup fostering to boost wolf genetics

May. 29, 2020 12:03 AM EDT

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A record number of captive-born wolf pups has been placed into the wild as part of an effort by federal and state wildlife managers to boost the genetic diversity among Mexican gray wolves in the Southwestern United States. The interagency team announced the results of this...

A juvenile black bear roams through Fort Myers, Fla., Tuesday morning, May 26, 2020. The bear was eventually trapped by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officers and will be relocated. (Andrew West/The News-Press via AP)

Glazed or jelly? Doughnuts lure city-roaming bear into trap

May. 27, 2020 1:40 PM EDT

FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) — Glazed or jelly? A black bear roaming around a Florida city proved no match for the doughnuts that lured the animal into a humane trap. The Fort Myers News-Press reports that the juvenile 250-pound (113- kilogram) bear spent a good chunk of Tuesday morning meandering around the...

Bear in Erie backyard tree removed, to be released elsewhere

May. 24, 2020 9:12 PM EDT

ERIE, Pa. (AP) — State game commission wardens in northwestern Pennsylvania tranquilized and removed a 127-pound bear from a neighborhood in the city of Erie over the weekend. Erie police and game wardens were called to the east Erie neighborhood at about 2:30 p.m. Saturday after the animal was spotted in...

Officials: Loon killed bald eagle by stabbing its heart

May. 20, 2020 9:00 PM EDT

BRIDGTON, Maine (AP) — A bald eagle died last year in Maine after being stabbed through the heart by a loon, wildlife officials said. A biologist at the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife recently got word about the July 2019 attack, the Bangor Daily News reported Wednesday. Danielle...

FILE - In this Dec. 2, 2016 file photo, a Pacific fisher takes off running after being released into a forest at Mount Rainier National Park, Wash. The Pacific fisher, a weasel-like carnivore native to Oregon's southern old growth forests, has been denied endangered species protection in the state, the latest twist in a legal back-and-forth that has continued for 20 years. In the decision issued last week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declined to grant the fisher threatened status in southern Oregon and northern California, citing voluntary conservation measures as effective in protecting the woodland creatures. Today, biologists estimate anywhere from a few hundred to a couple thousand fishers live in Oregon, most near the California border. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

US: Weasel-like mammal endangered in southern Sierra Nevada

May. 20, 2020 6:51 PM EDT

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Reversing course again in a 30-year-old battle over protection of a weasel-like mammal that eats porcupines, the U.S. government is declaring the Pacific fisher endangered in the southern Sierra Nevada but denying protection elsewhere in California and Oregon. The Fish and Wildlife...

Miami-Dade firefighters Christian Blanco, left, and Matthew Gutierrez, put out spot fires, Thursday, May 14, 2020, off 26th Street in Golden Gate Estates, Fla. (Jon Austria/Naples Daily News via AP)

I-75 reopens in southwest Florida as wildfire continues

May. 14, 2020 9:04 PM EDT

NAPLES, Fla. (AP) — A section of Interstate 75 known as Alligator Alley reopened Thursday afternoon after four brush fires that eventually merged in southwest Florida caused it to close a day earlier, authorities said. The four fires merged and grew into a 8,500-acre (3,440-hectare) fire on Thursday,...

Obamas, Oprah join Chicago project reading to kids online

May. 14, 2020 3:23 PM EDT

CHICAGO (AP) — Barack and Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey have joined the ranks of famous Chicagoans who are reading children's books in videos posted online by the Chicago Public Library to engage families during the coronavirus pandemic. The former president and first lady's video of “The Word...