Latest Right to privacy News

FILE - In this file photo dated Wednesday, March 28, 2012, a security cctv camera is seen by the Olympic Stadium at the Olympic Park in London.  The South Wales police deployed facial recognition surveillance equipment on Sunday Jan. 12, 2020, in a test to monitor crowds arriving for a weekend soccer match in real-time, that is prompting public debate about possible aggressive uses of facial recognition in Western democracies, raising questions about human rights and how the technology may enter people's daily lives in the future.  (AP Photo/Sang Tan, FILE)

London police to use face scan tech, stoking privacy fears

Jan. 24, 2020 12:08 PM EST

LONDON (AP) — London police will start using facial recognition cameras to pick out suspects from street crowds in real time, in a major advance for the controversial technology that raises worries about automated surveillance and erosion of privacy rights. The Metropolitan Police Service said Friday that...

FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2019, file photo a woman types on a keyboard in New York. Forty million Californians will shortly obtain sweeping digital privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)

Calif. vastly expands digital privacy. Will people use it?

Dec. 29, 2019 12:00 PM EST

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Forty million Californians will soon obtain sweeping digital privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S. — rights that could pose a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it created. So long as state residents don't mind shouldering much of the...

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo California Attorney General Xavier Becerra gestures while speaking at a media conference in San Francisco. Forty million Californians will shortly obtain sweeping digital privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. “If we do this right in California,

Calif. vastly expands digital privacy. Will people use it?

Dec. 29, 2019 11:15 AM EST

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Forty million Californians will soon have sweeping digital-privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. So long as state residents don't mind shouldering much of the burden of exercising...

California court restores case by therapists on porn privacy

Dec. 26, 2019 5:33 PM EST

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Supreme Court revived a long-running debate Thursday when it reinstated a lawsuit over whether psychotherapists must tell authorities when patients report they are attracted to child pornography. Lower courts had tossed out the lawsuit by three therapists who argued...

FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2019, file photo commuters pass through the World Trade Center in New York. A study by a U.S. agency has found that facial recognition technology often performs unevenly based on a person's race, gender or age. This is the first time the National Institute of Standards and Technology has investigated demographic differences in how face-scanning algorithms are able to identify people. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Federal study finds race, gender affect face-scanning tech

Dec. 19, 2019 5:05 PM EST

A study by a U.S. agency has found that facial recognition technology often performs unevenly based on a person's race, gender or age. But the nuanced report published Thursday is unlikely to allay the concerns of critics who worry about bias in face-scanning applications that are increasingly being adopted by...

FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019 file photo, Travelers walk through a security checkpoint in Terminal 2 at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. The Homeland Security Department is backing away from requiring U.S. citizens to submit to facial-recognition technology when they leave or enter the country. The department said Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019 that it has no plans to expand facial recognition to U.S. citizens. A spokesman said DHS will delete the idea from its regulatory agenda, where privacy advocates spotted it this week  (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

DHS retreats on possible facial screening of US citizens

Dec. 5, 2019 6:45 PM EST

DALLAS (AP) — The Homeland Security Department is backing away from requiring that U.S. citizens submit to facial-recognition technology when they leave or enter the country. The department said Thursday that it has no plans to expand facial recognition to U.S. citizens. A spokesman said DHS will delete...

Former Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck, left, who was named interim police superintendent in Chicago by Mayor Lori Lightfoot, addresses a news conference where he fielded questions on the firing by Lightfoot of retiring superintendent Eddie Johnson and Facebook gun sales Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019. Standing with Beck is First Deputy Superintendent Anthony Riccio, as the pair announced that investigators have arrested more than 50 people accused of using private Facebook groups and messages to sell guns or drugs. Police also blamed the social media company for complicating such cases by taking down investigators' fake profiles during a Tuesday press conference announcing results of the two-year investigation. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

Chicago police blame Facebook for illegal gun, drug sales

Dec. 3, 2019 6:28 PM EST

CHICAGO (AP) — Private Facebook groups have “emboldened” sellers of illegal drugs and guns to connect with potential buyers over the social media site, Chicago police said Tuesday, as leaders announced that a two-year undercover investigation led to more than 50 arrests. Police leaders,...

A general view during a Parliamentary session in Bratislava, Slovakia, Friday, Nov. 29, 2019. Lawmakers in Slovakia are scheduled to debate a proposed law that would compel women seeking an abortion to first have an ultrasound and listen to the heartbeat of the embryo or fetus, a move many groups have decried as a backward step for women’s rights. The bill was submitted by three members of the conservative Slovak National Party, who wrote that it is intended “to ensure that women are informed about the current stage of their pregnancy” before having an abortion. (Pavol Zachar/TASR via AP)

Slovakia may force women to get pre-abortion ultrasound

Nov. 29, 2019 7:39 AM EST

LONDON (AP) — Lawmakers in Slovakia are scheduled to debate a proposed law Friday that would compel women seeking an abortion to first have an ultrasound and listen to the heartbeat of the embryo or fetus, a move many groups have decried as a backward step for women’s rights. The bill was submitted...