Latest American Civil Liberties Union News

Dex Rumsey, 15, is photographed with his mother Robyn and father Clay Friday, Jan. 17, 2020, in Roy, Utah. Dex Rumsey, 15, came out as transgender at age 12. In consultation with a counselor and doctors, he gradually began wearing short hair and boy's clothes, then began using puberty blockers and eventually testosterone. His parents say he's gone from a shy, withdrawn child to a happy, thriving kid. He scared he could become depressed and suicidal again a ban on hormone therapy and sex-reassignment surgery for minors were to pass. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

LGBT activists say new bills target transgender youth

Jan. 18, 2020 10:55 AM EST

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — At the urging of conservative advocacy groups, Republican legislators in more than a dozen states are promoting bills that focus on transgender young people. One batch of bills would bar doctors from providing them certain gender-related medical treatment; another batch would bar...

President Donald Trump listens to a question during an event on prayer in public schools, in the Oval Office of the White House, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Trump boosts school prayer, faith groups as he rallies base

Jan. 16, 2020 6:18 PM EST

In a bid to solidify his evangelical base, President Donald Trump on Thursday vowed to protect prayer in public schools and took new steps to give religious organizations easier access to federal programs. Speaking at an Oval Office event and joined by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, Trump unveiled the federal...

ACLU: Disabled asylum seeker wins humanitarian parole

Jan. 16, 2020 3:46 PM EST

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A disabled Honduran man who is seeking asylum has been released from detention by immigration authorities in Louisiana, a civil rights group said Thursday. The American Civil Liberties Union of Louisiana says Manuel Amaya Portillo, 23, was granted humanitarian parole and will stay with a...

FILE - This combination of file photos shows actors Patrick Stewart, left, and Samuel L. Jackson.  Stewart and Jackson will be among the readers for a new audiobook about famous American legal cases.

New audiobook features Patrick Stewart, Samuel L. Jackson

Jan. 16, 2020 8:33 AM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — Sir Patrick Stewart, Samuel L. Jackson and Lucy Liu will be among the readers for the audio edition of a new anthology edited in part by the American Civil Liberties Union. “Fight of the Century” is a collaboration between the ACLU and authors Michael Chabon and Ayelet...

FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2019, file photo, Guatemalans who were deported from the United States arrive to La Aurora International airport in Guatemala City. A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday argues that Trump administration asylum agreements with Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras are illegal. The agreements allow U.S. immigration officials to send asylum seekers to the Central American nations. The American Civil Liberties lawsuit says the agreements are dangerous and violate the historic role of the U.S. as a humanitarian nation. The American Civil Liberties Union and other civil rights groups want the so-called cooperative asylum agreements declared illegal, and are asking a federal judge to block Homeland Security officials from enforcing the new rules. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo, File)

Asylum agreements with Central American nations challenged

Jan. 15, 2020 7:34 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump administration agreements with Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras that allow U.S. immigration officials to send asylum seekers to the Central American nations violate the historic role of the U.S. as a humanitarian nation and should be blocked, according to a legal challenge filed...

FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, people wait to apply for asylum in the United States along the border in Tijuana, Mexico. A federal judge rules that the Trump administration is operating within its authority when separating families stopped at the Mexican border, rejecting arguments that it was quietly returning to widespread practices that drew international condemnation. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

Judge refuses to second-guess family separations at border

Jan. 13, 2020 10:37 PM EST

SAN DIEGO (AP) — A U.S. judge ruled Monday that the Trump administration is operating within its authority when separating families stopped at the Mexico border, rejecting arguments that it was quietly returning to widespread practices that drew international condemnation. The American Civil Liberties...

ACLU sues school district over 'bloody Indian' comment

Jan. 8, 2020 3:07 PM EST

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico on Wednesday sued the state's largest school district and a former teacher over a 2018 incident where the teacher allegedly cut a Native American student's hair during class on Halloween and asked another student if she was dressed...

Guatemalan seeking asylum sues US to reunite with family

Jan. 6, 2020 2:43 PM EST

BOSTON (AP) — A Guatemalan woman seeking asylum in Massachusetts is suing the federal government to reunite with her partner and son, who have been ordered to remain in Mexico under the Trump administration's asylum process. The lawsuit filed on behalf of Maudy Constanza and her partner, Hanz Morales,...

In this Feb. 21, 2019, photo, a snow-encrusted sign marks the entrance to the police station located on a tundra road on the outskirts of Nome, Alaska. An internal cold case audit launched in 2019 has uncovered evidence that the agency regularly failed to fully investigate sexual assaults. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

In Nome, Alaska, review of rape ‘cold cases’ hits a wall

Dec. 21, 2019 12:11 AM EST

NOME, Alaska (AP) — The two cops — the cold case detective from Virginia and the evidence technician from Alaska — had a mission. Sift through more than a decade of grim stories from this small city set between the Bering Strait and Alaska’s western tundra. Nome’s new police...

FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2019, file photo commuters pass through the World Trade Center in New York. A study by a U.S. agency has found that facial recognition technology often performs unevenly based on a person's race, gender or age. This is the first time the National Institute of Standards and Technology has investigated demographic differences in how face-scanning algorithms are able to identify people. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Federal study finds race, gender affect face-scanning tech

Dec. 19, 2019 5:05 PM EST

A study by a U.S. agency has found that facial recognition technology often performs unevenly based on a person's race, gender or age. But the nuanced report published Thursday is unlikely to allay the concerns of critics who worry about bias in face-scanning applications that are increasingly being adopted by...