Latest Human rights and civil liberties News

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks during a news conference with Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden at the Hotel DuPont in Wilmington, Del., Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Harris bringing energy, dollars and more to Biden's campaign

Aug. 13, 2020 10:21 PM EDT

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — In her first two days as Joe Biden's running mate, Kamala Harris has fired off the campaign's sharpest criticism of President Donald Trump's shortcomings. She has vouched for Biden's character on race and more. And the enthusiasm surrounding her historic candidacy has brought in a...

Eric Severson holds a sign as a few dozen people gather in front of the United States Post Office on Rodd St. to protest recent changes to the U.S. Postal Service under new Postmaster General Louis DeJoy Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020 in Midland, Mich. (Katy Kildee/Midland Daily News via AP)

Trump admits he's blocking postal cash to stop mail-in votes

Aug. 13, 2020 9:50 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump frankly acknowledged Thursday that he's starving the U.S. Postal Service of money in order to make it harder to process an expected surge of mail-in ballots, which he worries could cost him the election. In an interview on Fox Business Network, Trump explicitly...

FILE - In this Sunday, April 5, 2020 file photo, a distance is measured as worshippers line up to take communion on Palm Sunday outside of Godspeak Calvary Chapel in Newbury Park, Calif. Churches in California and Minnesota, backed by a conservative legal group, have file lawsuits in August 2020 against the governors of their states challenging restrictions imposed due to the coronavirus outbreak that they contend are violations of religious liberty. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

More US churches sue to challenge COVID-19 restrictions

Aug. 13, 2020 8:14 PM EDT

Churches in California and Minnesota, backed by a conservative legal group, filed lawsuits this week against the governors of their states challenging restrictions imposed due to the coronavirus outbreak that they contend are violations of religious liberty. They’re the latest in a long series of legal...

Wisconsin man pleads guilty to vandalizing synagogue

Aug. 13, 2020 8:08 PM EDT

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A Wisconsin man has pleaded guilty to vandalizing a synagogue last year as part of a neo-Nazi plot, federal prosecutors said Thursday. Yousef Barasneh, 22, of Oak Creek, pleaded guilty Wednesday to a federal civil rights charge, U.S. Attorney Matthew Krueger of the Eastern District of...

FILE - President Donald Trump points to a question as he speaks during a briefing with reporters in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, in Washington.  TikTok and its U.S. employees are planning to take the Trump administration to court over a sweeping order that could ban the popular video app, according to a lawyer preparing one of the lawsuits. The employees’ legal challenge to Trump’s executive order will be separate from a pending lawsuit from the company that owns the app, says Mike Godwin, an internet policy lawyer representing the employees. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

TikTok and its employees prepare to fight Trump over app ban

Aug. 13, 2020 7:52 PM EDT

TikTok and its U.S. employees are planning to take President Donald Trump's administration to court over his sweeping order to ban the popular video app, according to a lawyer preparing one of the lawsuits. The employees' legal challenge to Trump's executive order will be separate from a pending lawsuit from the...

FILE - This combination of file photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office in Minnesota on Wednesday, June 3, 2020, shows Derek Chauvin, from left, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. Prosecutors say they may revisit the issue of audio-visual coverage of the trials of four former Minneapolis police officers charged in the death of George Floyd.  Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder of Floyd, a black man who died after being restrained by him and the other Minneapolis police officers on May 25. Kueng, Lane and Thao have been charged with aiding and abetting Chauvin. (Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Ex-cop's video captures crowd's horror during Floyd arrest

Aug. 13, 2020 7:23 PM EDT

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Newly released body-camera video from a third officer involved in George Floyd’s arrest captures for the first time the growing horror of onlookers who repeatedly pleaded with the officers to get off Floyd. The video made available Thursday comes from fired Officer Tou Thao, one...

Austin cuts police budget by 1/3 amid national 'defund' push

Aug. 13, 2020 6:52 PM EDT

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — In a unanimous vote, the Austin City Council moved Thursday to cut about one-third of next year's $434 million police budget amid national calls for “defunding” law enforcement agencies in favor of spending more money on social services. That will come to just over $150...

Cop fired for racist Christmas decorations returns to work

Aug. 13, 2020 6:41 PM EDT

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Minneapolis police officer who was fired for decorating a Christmas tree with racist items has been reinstated through arbitration, a process that makes it difficult to fire officers and has been cited as an obstacle to police reform. The arbitrator ruled that Mark Bohnsack was wrongly...

FILE - In this Sept. 10, 2015 file photo, Wayuu children play in Manaure, Colombia. A human rights group released a report Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020, warning that lack of access to clean water is leading to alarmingly high levels of child mortality and malnutrition among the Wayuu, Colombia’s largest Indigenous group. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara, File)

Rights group: Alarming child mortality among Colombian Wayuu

Aug. 13, 2020 5:40 PM EDT

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Lack of access to clean water is leading to alarmingly high levels of child mortality and malnutrition among Colombia’s largest Indigenous group — problems that could grow worse as a result of the pandemic, a human rights group warned Thursday. The death rate of Wayuu...

In this March 5, 2020, photo, Antonio Valenzuela's daughters, flanked by friends, kneel, at the spot their father died during an altercation with Las Cruces police on Feb. 29, 2020. An agreement announced Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020, between the city of Las Cruces and a lawyer for Valenzuela's family requires the city to provide racial bias training for police and require officers to intervene in possible excessive force episodes following Valenzuela's choking death. (Bethany Freudenthal/The Las Cruces Sun News via AP)

New Mexico city agrees to police reforms in choke settlement

Aug. 13, 2020 5:35 PM EDT

A New Mexico city will seek to adopt racial bias training for police and may require officers to intervene in possible excessive force episodes following the choking death of a Latino man, according to an agreement in a lawsuit announced Thursday. The deal between the city of Las Cruces and a lawyer for the...