Latest Supreme courts News

This Jan. 17, 2021 photo shows the independent Thaddeus Stevens School in Lyndon, Vt. Four families, including one whose children attend the school, are suing Vermont over a voucher program that allows students in communities that don't have schools or are not part of supervisory unions to attend schools of their choice, including approved private institutions, with the towns paying the tuition. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

School choice lawsuit surge pushes possible high court fight

Jan. 18, 2021 9:35 AM EST

Vermont is facing at least its second lawsuit in four months over a voucher program that allows students in communities that don't have schools or are not part of supervisory unions to attend schools of their choice, including approved private institutions. The Vermont system in which certain towns pay tuition...

This combo of file photos from Washington show Supreme Court Associate Justice Thurgood Marshall  on Oct. 24, 1967; and Constance Baker Motley, nominated to be judge of the southern district of New York, at her confirmation hearing, on April 4, 1966. The NAACP's Legal Defense Fund launched a $40 million scholarship program on Monday, Jan. 18, 2021, to create a new generation of civil rights lawyers. The Marshall-Motley Scholars Program, named for the legal defense fund's founder and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, and his staff attorney Constance Baker Motley, who later became the first Black female federal judge. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi, left, and Henry Griffin)

Anonymous $40 million gift funding 50 civil rights lawyers

Jan. 18, 2021 1:10 AM EST

ATLANTA (AP) — The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund launched a $40 million scholarship program on Monday to support a new generation of civil rights lawyers, dedicated to pursuing racial justice across the South. With that whopping gift from a single anonymous donor, the fund plans to put 50...

An Afghan man sweeps blood after Gunmen fired in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, Jan. 17, 2021. Gunmen fired on a car in northern Kabul on Sunday, killing two women judges who worked for Afghanistan's high court and wounding the driver, a court official said. It was the latest attack in the Afghan capital during peace talks between Taliban and Afghan government officials in Qatar. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Official: Gunmen kill two women judges in Afghan capital

Jan. 17, 2021 3:02 AM EST

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Gunmen fired on a car in northern Kabul on Sunday, killing two women judges who worked for Afghanistan's high court and wounding the driver, a court official said. It was the latest attack in the Afghan capital during peace talks between Taliban and Afghan government officials in...

FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2020 file photo, anti-abortion activists participate in the

March for Life asks its supporters to stay home this year

Jan. 16, 2021 3:33 PM EST

Organizers of the March for Life, the anti-abortion movement’s preeminent annual event, are asking their supporters nationwide not to gather in Washington this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic and political unrest. Instead, a small group of invited anti-abortion leaders will march Jan. 29, and the...

ND officials predicted electoral vote lawsuit would fail

Jan. 16, 2021 1:35 PM EST

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Emails indicate North Dakota’s attorney general signed onto the Texas lawsuit over the presidential election despite expectations from some of his top officials that the legal challenge would fail. The U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the lawsuit which 17 states signed onto...

Admitted cop killer pleads guilty, gets life without parole

Jan. 15, 2021 10:31 PM EST

DALLAS (AP) — A man was sentenced to life imprisonment without parol Friday for the April 2018 shooting death of a Dallas police officer. Armando Luis Juarez pleaded guilty to capital murder Friday in Dallas after striking a deal with prosecutors to avoid a death sentence and an independent psychological...

Oklahoma tribes want criminal justice agreements with state

Jan. 15, 2021 7:58 PM EST

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Tribe leaders of the Cherokee and Chickasaw Nations want Congress to allow them to make agreements with the state of Oklahoma in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding criminal jurisdictions. Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. said the decision— which...

Steven Dillingham, the director of the U.S. Census Bureau, speaks outside the Oklahoma State Capitol, Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, in Oklahoma City, encouraging people to fill out their census form before the end of the month. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Census numbers won't be released before change in power

Jan. 15, 2021 5:26 PM EST

Government attorneys and municipalities fighting over the 2020 census asked a judge Friday to put their court case on hold, as Department of Justice attorneys confirmed the Census Bureau for now will not release numbers that could be used to exclude people in the U.S. illegally from the process of divvying up...

FILE - This images shows a depiction of Abraham Lincoln taking the oath of office as the 16th president of the United States administered by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, on March 4, 1861. Historians cite the first inaugural speeches of Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln as possible parallels for Joe Biden, who has said his goal is to “restore the soul” of the country even as millions baselessly insist incumbent Donald Trump was the winner. (AP Photo, File)

Unity has long been a theme, and anxiety, for new presidents

Jan. 15, 2021 11:47 AM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — When Joe Biden addresses the country for the first time as president, his inaugural speech is likely to echo calls for unity that predecessors have invoked since the first time George Washington was sworn in. Unity has since been a theme, and an anxiety, for many incoming presidents, who...

Christina Bollo of Urbana, Illinois, holds a sign as she protests the execution of Corey Johnson, near the Federal Correctional Complex, Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021, in Terre Haute, Ind. (Joseph C. Garza/The Tribune-Star via AP)

US executes Virginia gang killer despite COVID-19 infection

Jan. 15, 2021 11:46 AM EST

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — The U.S. government executed a drug trafficker Thursday for slaying seven people in a burst of violence in Virginia’s capital in 1992, with some witnesses in the death-chamber building applauding as the 52-year-old was pronounced dead. Corey Johnson's execution went ahead...