Latest U.S. Department of Justice News

The Senate side of the U.S. Capitol at sunrise on Monday, Jan. 20, 2020, in Washington. The impeachment trial of President Donald Trump will resume in the U.S. Senate on Tuesday.  (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)

Justice Dept. memos back defiance of impeachment subpoenas

Jan. 20, 2020 6:47 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Monday released Justice Department legal opinions meant to bolster its case for defying subpoenas from Congress in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. One opinion, dated Sunday, says Trump administration officials were free to disregard subpoenas sent...

The Stewart Detention Center is seen through the front gate, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019, in Lumpkin, Ga. The rural town is about 140 miles southwest of Atlanta and next to the Georgia-Alabama state line. The town’s 1,172 residents are outnumbered by the roughly 1,650 male detainees that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said were being held in the detention center in late November. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

AP visits immigration courts across US, finds nonstop chaos

Jan. 19, 2020 12:02 AM EST

LUMPKIN, Ga. (AP) — In a locked, guarded courtroom in a compound surrounded by razor wire, Immigration Judge Jerome Rothschild waits -- and stalls. A Spanish interpreter is running late because of a flat tire. Rothschild tells the five immigrants before him that he’ll take a break before the...

FILE - In this May 8, 2014, file photo, then Baylor University President Ken Starr testifies at the House Committee on Education and Workforce on college athletes forming unions. in Washington. President Donald Trump's legal team will include former Harvard University law professor Alan Dershowitz and Ken Starr, the former independent counsel who led the Whitewater investigation into President Bill Clinton, according to a person familiar with the matter. The team will also include Pam Bondi, the former Florida attorney general. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

Who's who on Trump's legal team for impeachment trial

Jan. 18, 2020 12:24 AM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s legal advocates for his Senate impeachment trial will include a pair of well-known attorneys who have vigorously defended Trump on television and played roles in some of the most consequential legal dramas in recent history. Among those assisting White...

Alaska man given 9 years in prison for heroin distribution

Jan. 17, 2020 11:22 PM EST

KENAI, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska man was sentenced to nine years in federal prison for distributing large quantities of heroin throughout the Kenai Peninsula, authorities said. Matthew Sean Bremond, 32, of Soldotna was sentenced Jan. 15, The Peninsula Clarion reported Thursday. Bremond pleaded guilty in...

FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2020, file photo Attorney General William Barr and FBI Deputy Director David Bowdich, second from left, address reporters at the Justice Department in Washington to announce results of an investigation of the shootings at the Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida. An an image of an iPhone is displayed at left. The Justice Department has placed a high national-security priority on its probe of the incident, insisting that investigators must get access to data from two locked and encrypted iPhones that belonged to the alleged gunman, a Saudi aviation student. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

AP Explains: The Justice Department's new quarrel with Apple

Jan. 17, 2020 3:15 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — The deadly shooting of three U.S. sailors at a Navy installation in December could reignite a long-simmering fight between the federal government and tech companies over data privacy and encryption. As part of its probe into the violent incident, deemed a terrorist act by the government,...

Attorney General William Barr speaks to reporters at the Justice Department in Washington, Monday, Jan. 13, 2020, to announce results of an investigation of the shootings at the Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida. On Dec. 6, 2019, 21-year-old Saudi Air Force officer, 2nd Lt. Mohammed Alshamrani, opened fire at the naval base in Pensacola, killing three U.S. sailors and injuring eight other people. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

US military training for Saudi students could resume soon

Jan. 16, 2020 12:31 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. training for more than 800 Saudi Arabian military students could be restarted "in the coming days," the Pentagon said Thursday, nearly six weeks after a shooting by one Saudi trainee killed three sailors at a Florida base. The Pentagon had stopped all flight and field training for...

An Equal Rights Amendment supporters yell encouragement to two legislators as they walk down a hallway inside the state Capitol in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020. A House committee approved a resolution Tuesday,  to ratify the state's Equal Rights Amendment, which advocates hope will become the next amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The 13-9 vote split along party lines, with all Democrats supporting it and all Republicans opposing it.(Bob Brown/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)

Virginia moves to brink of becoming 38th state to ratify ERA

Jan. 16, 2020 11:09 AM EST

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia on Wednesday moved to the brink of becoming the crucial 38th state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment in what was seen as a momentous victory for the women's rights movement even though it is far from certain the measure will ever be added to the U.S. Constitution. The state...

Sleep apnea company pays $37.5M to settle kickback lawsuits

Jan. 15, 2020 9:10 PM EST

SAN DIEGO (AP) — ResMed, a San Diego-based company that sells sleep apnea machines, will pay $37.5 million to settle allegations that it provided kickbacks to obtain customer referrals, federal prosecutors announced Wednesday. The settlement covers five whistleblower lawsuits filed on behalf of the federal...

Environmental groups challenge plastics complex permit

Jan. 15, 2020 5:32 PM EST

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Conservation and community groups sued the Trump administration Wednesday, challenging environmental permits for a Taiwan company's planned $9.4 billion plastics complex in Louisiana. The lawsuit filed in federal court in Washington accuses the Army Corps of Engineers of failing to...

FILE - In this July 8, 2019, file photo, Attorney General William Barr watches as inmates work in a computer class during a tour of a federal prison. in Edgefield, S.C. The Justice Department is making changes to its system used to identify whether an inmate is likely to commit crimes again after release from prison to ensure the process is fair and effective. It's part of a sweeping criminal justice overhaul measure that was enacted last year. The federal Bureau of Prisons has already assessed nearly all of the 175,269 inmates in federal custody. But the Justice Department plans to re-screen all of those inmates under new guidelines, which officials say places a stronger emphasis on accurately measuring an inmate’s change behind bars. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

AP Exclusive: Justice changing how inmate risk is assessed

Jan. 15, 2020 4:48 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is changing the system it uses to assess whether an inmate is likely to commit crimes after being released from prison, aiming to ensure the process is fairer and more effective. The impetus for the change is a criminal justice overhaul signed into law in late 2018....