Latest U.S. Department of Justice News

In this image provided by the U.S. State Department, Michael White holds an American flag as he poses for a photo Thursday, June 4, 2020, with U.S. special envoy for Iran Brian Hook at the Zurich, Switzerland, airport after White’s release from Iran.  White, a Navy veteran who's been detained in Iran for nearly two years has been released and is making his way home, with the first leg on a Swiss government aircraft. (U.S. State Department via AP)

Detained US Navy veteran freed by Iran as part of deal

Jun. 4, 2020 11:41 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. Navy veteran whose family said his only crime was falling in love left Iran on Thursday after nearly two years of detention, winning his freedom as part of a deal that spared an American-Iranian physician from any additional time behind bars. Michael White flew from Tehran to...

Police begin to clear demonstrators gather as they protest the death of George Floyd, Monday, June 1, 2020, near the White House in Washington. Floyd died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

ACLU sues over police force on protesters near White House

Jun. 4, 2020 6:15 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — The American Civil Liberties Union sued the Trump administration Thursday, alleging officials violated the civil rights of protesters who were forcefully removed from a park near the White House by police using chemical agents before President Donald Trump walked to a nearby church to...

Federal officers stand outside the Department of Justice as Attorney General William Barr speaks during a virtual press conference inside the building Thursday, June 4, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Barr: Divide between African Americans, police 'must change'

Jun. 4, 2020 5:51 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr sought on Thursday to quell tensions over the death of George Floyd in police custody, acknowledging a divide between many black Americans and the police and promising to spare no resource as the Justice Department investigates whether a federal civil rights...

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks during Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 3, 2020. (Greg Nash/Pool via AP)

Raw feelings abound as Senate turns back to Russia probe

Jun. 4, 2020 5:43 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two Republican-led Senate committees have launched election-year investigations into the Justice Department’s Russia probe, resurrecting the issue at the urging of President Donald Trump while reigniting the partisan hostility that comes along with it. In two committee rooms...

FILE- This Jan. 8, 2017 file photo shows the Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) in the Brooklyn borough of New York. An inmate at the jail died after being pepper sprayed by officers in his cell, the federal Bureau of Prisons said, Wednesday, June 3, 2020. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)

Federal inmate dies after being pepper sprayed by guards

Jun. 4, 2020 5:15 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — A federal jail inmate in New York City died Wednesday after correctional officers sprayed him with pepper spray, the Bureau of Prisons said. Officers sprayed Jamel Floyd, a 35-year-old black man, after he barricaded himself in his cell at Brooklyn’s Metropolitan Detention Center and...

Missouri's Sen. Blunt wants more federal police reviews

Jun. 4, 2020 12:33 PM EDT

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri's Republican U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt on Wednesday called on the U.S. attorney general to act in response to nationwide protests against police brutality following the death of George Floyd. “In the wake of the recent tragic deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and...

FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2019, file photo State Department Inspector General Steve Linick leaves a meeting in a secure area at the Capitol in Washington. Linick irritated powerful Democrats and Republicans alike in his seven years as the independent watchdog investigating waste and mismanagement at the State Department. Still, he was stunned by a Friday night phone call saying President Donald Trump had fired him. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Ousted State watchdog confirms investigations into Pompeo

Jun. 4, 2020 12:17 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ousted State Department Inspector General Steve Linick on Wednesday told members of three congressional committees that before he was abruptly fired, he was investigating Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s use of government resources as well as the secretary’s decision to...

Peaceful protesters fill the intersection in front of Seattle City Hall Wednesday, June 3, 2020, in Seattle, following protests over the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Huge crowd protests in Seattle as criticism of police mounts

Jun. 3, 2020 10:34 PM EDT

SEATTLE (AP) — A sea of protesters packed streets in Seattle on Wednesday in a sixth straight day of demonstrations over the killing of George Floyd, amid increasing criticism of the police department's repeated use of tear gas and flash-bangs to disperse mostly peaceful crowds. By mid-afternoon thousands...

Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is sworn in before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 3, 2020. (Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via AP)

Rosenstein says he wouldn't approve Russia warrant now

Jun. 3, 2020 9:17 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told lawmakers Wednesday that he would not have approved an FBI surveillance application for a former Trump campaign aide during the Russia investigation had he known at the time about the problems that have since been revealed. Rosenstein's...

FILE - In this Aug. 30, 2005, file photo, floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina fill the streets near downtown New Orleans. Two New Orleans universities, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans and a government contractor are defendants in a whistleblower lawsuit alleging fraud involving more than $100 million in Hurricane Katrina aid. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Universities, archdiocese named in lawsuit over Katrina aid

Jun. 3, 2020 9:05 PM EDT

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Two New Orleans universities, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans and a government contractor are defendants in a whistleblower lawsuit alleging fraud involving more than $100 million in Hurricane Katrina aid. The 2016 federal lawsuit was unsealed Wednesday by the U.S....