Latest Public opinion News

FILE - In this June 1, 2020, file photo, President Donald Trump holds a Bible as he visits outside St. John's Church across Lafayette Park from the White House in Washington. Trump began June with his Bible-clutching photo op outside the church after authorities used chemicals and batons to scatter peaceful demonstrators, and the month never got less jarring or divisive. Now, some Republicans are expressing concern about the month's impact on their party's ability to hold the Senate. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

GOP worries Trump's divisive June imperils Senate control

Jul. 7, 2020 11:53 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's June began with his Bible-clutching photo op outside a church after authorities used chemicals and batons to scatter peaceful demonstrators. It never got less jarring or divisive. By month's end, he was downplaying a coronavirus pandemic upsurge that was forcing...

Students wearing face masks to protect against the new coronavirus have their documents checked by security officers before the first day of China's national college entrance examinations, known as the gaokao, in Beijing, Tuesday, July 7, 2020. China's college entrance exams began in Beijing on Tuesday after being delayed by a month due to the coronavirus outbreak. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

The Latest: Air New Zealand puts hold on new flight bookings

Jul. 6, 2020 11:02 PM EDT

WELLINGTON, New Zealand — New Zealand’s national carrier has put a temporary hold on new bookings for flights into the country while the government tries to find enough quarantined hotel rooms for people returning home. Air New Zealand says the hold will last for three weeks and it is also trying...

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen Tuesday, June 30, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Supreme Court upholds cellphone robocall ban

Jul. 6, 2020 11:33 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday upheld a 1991 law that bars robocalls to cellphones. The case, argued by telephone in May because of the coronavirus pandemic, only arose after Congress in 2015 created an exception in the law that allowed the automated calls for collection of government debt. ...

Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike, left, talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the prime minister's office in Tokyo Monday, July 6, 2020. Gov. Koike, who won her second term to head the Japanese capital in Sunday's election, met with her political rival, Prime Minister Abe and agreed to cooperate in their effort to fight against the coronavirus and to safely achieve the Olympics next year. (Yoshitaka Sugawara/Kyodo News via AP)

Tokyo governor, Abe say they'll cooperate on virus, Olympics

Jul. 6, 2020 7:05 AM EDT

TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo’s newly reelected governor and her political rival, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, agreed Monday to cooperate on handling the coronavirus outbreak to safely hold the Olympics next year. Gov. Yuriko Koike met with Abe a day after winning her second term in an overwhelming...

Ultra-Orthodox Jews wait to cross a closed road to go to their homes as they wear protective face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus in Ashdod, Israel, Thursday, July 2, 2020. Coronavirus restrictions have gone into effect in Israel after the number of new cases there hit a record high the previous day, while the West Bank prepares to go into lockdown. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

Israel, Palestinians face new restrictions amid virus surge

Jul. 5, 2020 12:31 PM EDT

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — Israel said Sunday it has ordered thousands of people into quarantine after a contentious phone surveillance program resumed while Palestinians in the West Bank returned to life under lockdown amid a surge in coronavirus cases in both areas. Israel’s Health Ministry said...

Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike speaks at a news conference after winning a second term to head the Japanese capital, in Tokyo Sunday, July 5, 2020. (Kyodo News via AP)

Tokyo governor wins 2nd term, buoyed by handling of virus

Jul. 5, 2020 9:34 AM EDT

TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike has won a second term to head the Japanese capital, propelled to an election victory Sunday by public support for her handling of the coronavirus crisis despite a recent rise in infections that has raised concerns of a resurgence of the disease. In her victory speech,...

Outgoing French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe, left, applauds newly named Prime Minister Jean Castex, after the handover ceremony in Paris, Friday, July 3, 2020. French President Emmanuel Macron on Friday named Jean Castex, who coordinated France's virus reopening strategy, as the country's new prime minister as the country focuses on reviving an economy hard-hit by the pandemic and months of strict lockdown. (Thomas Samson, Pool via AP)

Reopening strategist Castex named new French prime minister

Jul. 3, 2020 1:26 PM EDT

PARIS (AP) — The new French prime minister appointed Friday said he feels ready to face the key challenge of reviving France's economy following the damage caused by the coronavirus pandemic and a two-month nationwide lockdown. The relatively low-profile Jean Castex, who coordinated France’s virus...

Ella Pamfilova, head of Russian Central Election Commission, wearing a face mask and gloves to protect against coronavirus, center left, gestures while speaking at a news conference in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, July 2, 2020. Almost 78% of voters in Russia have approved amendments to the country's constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to stay in power until 2036, Russian election officials said Thursday after all the votes were counted. Kremlin critics said the vote was rigged. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian opposition denounces vote extending Putin's rule

Jul. 2, 2020 11:49 AM EDT

MOSCOW (AP) — A vote that cleared the way for President Vladimir Putin to rule Russia until 2036 was denounced Thursday by his political opponents as a “Pyrrhic victory” that will only further erode his support and legitimacy. Putin himself thanked voters for their “support and...

FILE - In this June 3, 2020, file photo, demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd, Wednesday, June 3, 2020, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. It’s rare for public opinion on social issues to change sharply and swiftly. And yet in the wake of George Floyd’s death, polling shows dramatic movement in Americans’ opinions on police brutality and racial injustice.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Wide shift in opinion on police, race rare in US polling

Jul. 2, 2020 8:00 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's rare for public opinion on social issues to change sharply and swiftly. And yet in the wake of George Floyd's death, Americans' opinions about police brutality and racial injustice have moved dramatically. About half of American adults believe police violence against the public is a...

People rally on a section of 16th Street that's been renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza, Saturday, June 6, 2020, in Washington. A majority of white Democrats say police officers are more likely to use deadly force against a Black person than against a white person. That's according to a recent poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. (AP Photo/Dino Hazell)

AP-NORC poll: White Democrats grow more critical of police

Jul. 1, 2020 9:25 AM EDT

DETROIT (AP) — As a national reckoning over racism and policing grips the nation, white Democrats are far more likely now than they were a few years ago to think police brutality is a serious issue — a dramatic shift in public opinion that some say could shape the November presidential election. A...