Latest Climate change News

This July 2015 photo taken by University of Ottawa glaciology professor Luke Copland shows Canadian Ice Service ice analyst Adrienne White taking a photo of cracks of the Milne Ice Shelf, which just broke apart.  The Milne ice shelf was on of the Arctic's few remaining intact ice shelves, but at the end of July 2020 about 43% broke off. Scientists say that without a doubt it's man-made global warming. (Luke Copland via AP)

Canada's last intact ice shelf collapses due to warming

Aug. 7, 2020 3:38 PM EDT

Much of Canada's remaining intact ice shelf has broken apart into hulking iceberg islands thanks to a hot summer and global warming, scientists said. Canada's 4,000-year-old Milne Ice Shelf on the northwestern edge of Ellesmere Island had been the country's last intact ice shelf until the end of July when ice...

FILE - In this May 8, 2003, file photo, a Northern Spotted Owl flies after an elusive mouse jumping off the end of a stick in the Deschutes National Forest near Camp Sherman, Ore.. The Trump administration is moving to restrict what land and water can be declared as

US officials seek limits on "habitat" for imperiled species

Jul. 31, 2020 7:12 PM EDT

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration is moving to restrict what land and water areas can be declared as “habitat” for imperiled plants and animals — potentially excluding locations that species could use in the future as climate change upends ecosystems. An administration...

This photo taken July 13, 2020 at Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park shows a stretch of the lake's northeast shore looking north from Sand Harbor toward Incline Village, Nev.  Lake Tahoe's fluctuating clarity took a dive last year, worsening by about 8 feet during an especially cold and wet winter as sedimentation, algae growth and a tiny invasive shrimp continue to pose restoration challenges. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner).

Lake Tahoe's fluctuating clarity worsens amid wet winter

Jul. 31, 2020 4:32 PM EDT

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Lake Tahoe’s fluctuating clarity got worse last year during an especially cold and wet winter as sedimentation, algae growth and a tiny invasive shrimp continued to pose restoration challenges for the famed clear water of the mountain lake straddling the California-Nevada line. The...

FILE - In this May 27, 2020, file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington. Cuomo said on Saturday, June 18, 2020 that the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 in New York state dropped to 743 and 11 more people had died. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

NY removes climate change bond from 2020 ballot — for now

Jul. 30, 2020 4:08 PM EDT

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York's governor says the state's economy is too “murky” to move ahead with his sweeping proposal to address climate change by borrowing $3 billion to fund environmental restoration projects across New York. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a Thursday conference call with...

FILE - In this Friday, July 10, 2020 file grab taken from video provided by Russian Emergency Ministry, shows a Russian Emergency Ministry's Beriev plane BE-200 Be-200 multipurpose amphibious aircraft releasing water in the Trans-Baikal National Park in Buryatia, southern Siberia, Russia. The U.N. weather agency is warning that average temperatures in Siberia came in 10 degrees Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle. The high heat has also contributed to the rapid depletion of ice sea coverage off the Russian Arctic coast. World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said the Arctic is heating more than twice as fast as the global average. WMO says the extended heat is linked to a large “blocking pressure system” and northward swing of the jet stream. (Russian Emergency Ministry Press Service via AP, File)

Siberian heatwave: Wildfires rage in Arctic, sea ice melts

Jul. 24, 2020 10:03 AM EDT

GENEVA (AP) — The U.N. weather agency warned Friday that average temperatures in Siberia were 10 degrees Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle and contributed to a rapid depletion in ice sea off Russia's Arctic...

This photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows an Arctic grayling captured in a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fish trap at Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge near Lima, Montana. U.S. wildlife officials have rejected federal protections for the rare, freshwater fish species at the center of a long-running legal dispute. The decision, on Wednesday, July 22, 2020, comes almost two years after a federal appeals court faulted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for dismissing the threat that climate change and other pressures pose to Arctic grayling. (Jim Mogen/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)

US wildlife agency rejects protections for rare fish species

Jul. 22, 2020 7:14 PM EDT

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials on Wednesday rejected special protections for a rare, freshwater fish related to salmon that's been at the center of a long-running legal dispute, citing conservation efforts that officials say have increased Arctic grayling numbers in a Montana river. The...

Editorial Roundup: Florida

Jul. 22, 2020 3:05 PM EDT

Recent editorials from Florida newspapers: ___ July 22 The Miami Herald on unemployment benefits for Americans amid the coronavirus pandemic: Gov. DeSantis says that he hasn’t been following the debate in Washington over whether to extend federal unemployment benefits to jobless Americans. That’s...

Andrew Wheeler, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, wears a mask as he arrives for an event on regulatory reform on the South Lawn of the White House, Thursday, July 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

US says it will adopt global climate standards for aviation

Jul. 22, 2020 2:41 PM EDT

The Trump administration said Wednesday that it plans to adopt aircraft emissions standards modeled on international ones, a move it says will not further reduce climate-damaging emissions from planes. Andrew Wheeler, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, said the change “strikes the right...

A BNSF Railway train hauling carloads of coal from the Powder River Basin of Montana and Wyoming is seen east of Hardin, Mont., on July 15, 2020. A coalition of states is renewing its push to stop the Trump administration from selling coal from public lands. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)

States try again to block coal sales that Trump revived

Jul. 20, 2020 5:20 PM EDT

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A coalition of states, environmentalists and American Indians on Monday renewed its push to stop the Trump administration from selling coal from public lands after a previous effort to halt the lease sales was dismissed by a federal judge. Joined by the Northern Cheyenne Tribe and...

Wealthier neighborhoods can claim a greater share of pollution primarily because they have larger homes.

Rich Americans spew more carbon pollution at home than poor

Jul. 20, 2020 3:47 PM EDT

Rich Americans produce nearly 25% more heat-trapping gases than poorer people at home, according to a comprehensive study of U.S. residential carbon footprints. Scientists studied 93 million housing units in the nation to analyze how much greenhouse gases are being spewed in different locations and by income,...