Latest Constitutions News

FILE - In this April 6, 2020 file photo Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference at Liberty Plaza in downtown Atlanta. By requiring Georgia voters to provide their own stamps for mail-in ballots, the state is effectively imposing a poll tax that is an unconstitutional barrier to the right to vote, according to a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday, April 8, 2020. (Alyssa Pointer/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

Lawsuit: Georgia mail-in ballot postage is unconstitutional

Apr. 8, 2020 4:44 PM EDT

ATLANTA (AP) — By requiring Georgia voters to provide their own stamps for mail-in ballots, the state is effectively imposing a poll tax that is an unconstitutional barrier to the right to vote, according to a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday. Citing the continuing spread of the coronavirus, Secretary of...

Stay-at-home order legal, Idaho attorney general says

Apr. 5, 2020 1:44 PM EDT

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Gov. Brad Little’s stay-at-home order to limit the spread of the coronavirus is legal and clearly defined by law, Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden said. Wasden said the Republican governor’s power to assert such an order is found within Idaho code. Little issued the...

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear speaks during a media conference at the state Capitol in Frankfort, Ky., to provide an update on the novel coronavirus on Sunday, March 29, 2020. (Ryan C. Hermens/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP)

Some Kentucky churches plan to gather, despite virus orders

Apr. 4, 2020 6:11 PM EDT

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Some Kentucky churches are still planning to hold in-person church services this Sunday, despite statewide orders that ban mass gatherings to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Louisville preacher Jack Roberts told The Courier Journal that he would rather go to jail and court...

FILE - In this May 23, 2017 file photograph, Dorothy Haymer of Yazoo City, at podium, Indigo Williams, left and Precious Hughes, right. both of Jackson, explains the reasons as African-American mothers of children in public elementary schools, they are plaintiffs in a Mississippi education lawsuit filed on her behalf, by the Southern Poverty Law Center, Tuesday, May 23, 2017, in Jackson, Miss. The women claimed Mississippi allows grave disparities in funding between predominantly black and predominantly white schools. On Thursday, April 2, 2020, a federal appeals court revived the lawsuit, reversing the 2019 decision by a U.S. district judge to dismiss the lawsuit filed against state officials by the Southern Poverty Law Center on the mothers' behalf. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

Court revives suit over Mississippi school funding disparity

Apr. 3, 2020 6:40 PM EDT

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A federal appeals court has revived a lawsuit that says Mississippi allows grave disparities in funding between predominantly black and predominantly white schools. The Thursday ruling by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reverses the 2019 decision by U.S. District Judge William...

FILE — In this May 22, 2019 file photo members of the California Teachers Association and proponents of public education march to the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., calling for an increase in funding for public schools. Supporters of a proposed amendment to the California Constitution that would raise property taxes on some businesses say they have collected more than 1.7 million signatures. The Schools & Communities First campaign announced Thursday, April 2, 2020 it has submitted the signatures to state officials. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Backers of California tax initiative submit signatures

Apr. 2, 2020 4:56 PM EDT

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Supporters of a proposed amendment to the California Constitution that would raise property taxes on some businesses by up to $12 billion a year announced Thursday they have collected more than 1.7 million signatures, all but assuring it will appear on the November ballot. The...

President Donald Trump listens during a briefing about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Wednesday, April 1, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump resists national shutdown, leaving it up to states

Apr. 2, 2020 6:12 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is resisting calls to issue a national stay-at-home order to stem the spread of the new coronavirus despite his administration's projections that tens of thousands of Americans are likely to be killed by the disease. One by one, though, states are increasingly...

Editorial Roundup: Mississippi

Apr. 1, 2020 4:21 PM EDT

Recent editorials from Mississippi newspapers: ___ March 31 The Greenwood Commonwealth on medical marijuana in Mississippi: Medical marijuana — unless someone can show it’s an effective treatment against the novel coronavirus — has lost some of its zip as a pressing concern in Mississippi....

Wyoming House speaker: Coronavirus special session likely

Mar. 31, 2020 4:50 PM EDT

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — The Wyoming Legislature will likely hold its first special session in over 15 years to allocate emergency federal funding to address the coronavirus pandemic and possibly other matters, House Speaker Steve Harshman said. “Nothing is certain in this life, but if you read the tea...

Civil rights lawsuit filed over canceled high court election

Mar. 31, 2020 4:32 PM EDT

ATLANTA (AP) — A lawsuit filed Tuesday said Georgia's secretary of state violated the law and deprived citizens of their right to vote by canceling a schedule election for a state Supreme Court seat. The civil rights suit against Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger was filed in federal court in Atlanta...

Two members of the military police patrol the streets in Budapest, Hungary, Monday, March 30, 2020. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, two days earlier the government implemented a lockdown. For two weeks, homes and residences may only be left for work or to purchase essential goods. Members of the police are tasked to ensure compliance with the rules by providing support and being empathetic with the residents. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (Zoltan Balogh/MTI via AP)

Hungary approves extra government powers, with no end date

Mar. 30, 2020 12:52 PM EDT

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Hungary's parliament on Monday approved a bill giving Prime Minister Viktor Orban's government extraordinary powers during the coronavirus pandemic, and setting no end date for them. The bill was approved by Orban's Fidesz party and other government supporters by 137 votes in favor...