Latest Environmental science News

Wisconsin hunters allowed to kill 10 elk, same as last year

May. 27, 2020 11:54 AM EDT

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — There will be no change in the number of elk that hunters can kill in Wisconsin this year, after the state Department of Natural Resources Board on Wednesday voted to keep the limit at 10. The board voted 5-2 to set the limit at the same as it was the last two seasons, going against...

Maine to collect ocean acidification data with new sensors

May. 24, 2020 2:24 PM EDT

BOOTHBAY HARBOR, Maine (AP) — Maine marine officials said three new sensors installed in a coastal community will help scientists get a better understanding of ocean acidifcation. The growing acid levels in the ocean are a hazard for some kinds of sea life, including some of those sought by Maine...

This undated photo provided by Timber Press shows monarch butterflies in the University of Delaware Botanical Garden in Newark, Del., and is featured in the Douglas Tallamy book

Author urges gardeners to form one big `national park’

May. 19, 2020 10:22 AM EDT

Imagine if all the back and front yards — and even patio container plants — across the country were seen as one magnificent patchwork quilt, a ``Homegrown National Park.” Home gardeners would join forces to bring back a variety of native plants to protect and nurture struggling birds, bees...

In this Friday, April 24, 2020 photo provide by the Alfred Wegener Insitute shows the German Arctic research vessel Polarstern in the ice next to a research camp in the Arctic region. Dozens of scientists are waiting in quarantine for the all-clear to join a year-long Arctic research mission aimed at improving the models used for forecasting climate change, just as the expedition reaches a crucial phase. For a while, the international mission looked like it might have to be called off, as country after country went into lockdown because of the virus, scuppering plans to bring fresh supplies and crew to the German research vessel Polarstern that's been moored in the high Arctic since last year. (Manuel Ernst/Alfred-Wegner-Institut via AP)

Virus delay, early ice melt challenge Arctic science mission

May. 10, 2020 5:03 AM EDT

BERLIN (AP) — They prepared for icy cold and trained to be on the watch for polar bears, but a pandemic just wasn't part of the program. Now dozens of scientists are waiting in quarantine for the all-clear to join a year-long Arctic research mission aimed at improving the models used for forecasting...

FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2015 file photo, Muslim pilgrims shelter themselves from the heat as they attend Friday afternoon prayers outside the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia. A new study released Monday, May 4, 2020, says 2 to 3.5 billion people in 50 years will be living in a climate that historically has proven just too hot to handle. Currently about 20 million people live in places with an annual average temperature greater than 84 degrees (29 degrees Celsius) — far beyond the temperature sweet spot. That area is less than 1% of the Earth’s land, and it is mostly near the Sahara Desert and includes Mecca, Saudi Arabia.  (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy, File)

Billions projected to suffer nearly unlivable heat in 2070

May. 4, 2020 3:19 PM EDT

KENSINGTON, Maryland (AP) — In just 50 years, 2 billion to 3.5 billion people, mostly the poor who can’t afford air conditioning, will be living in a climate that historically has been too hot to handle, a new study said. With every 1.8 degree (1 degree Celsius) increase in global average annual...

Gen Nashimoto, of Luminalt, installs solar panels in Hayward, Calif., on Wednesday, April 29, 2020. From New York to California, the U.S renewable energy industry is reeling from the new coronavirus pandemic, which has delayed construction and sowed doubts about major projects on the drawing board. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Takeaways from renewable energy's struggles amid pandemic

May. 2, 2020 10:57 AM EDT

The U.S. renewable energy industry is reeling from the new coronavirus pandemic, which has delayed construction and sowed doubts about major projects on the drawing board. As many as 120,000 jobs in solar and 35,000 in wind could be lost, trade groups say. Leaders are confident the future is bright. But the...

Wind turbines stand in various stages of completion at the Reading Wind Facility in Reading, Kan., on Thursday, April 23, 2020. Although the wind power project has experienced some delays in delivery of some foreign-sourced parts and had to implement social distancing measures, the project is on schedule to be completed in the next few weeks. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Solar, wind energy struggle as coronavirus takes toll

May. 2, 2020 10:38 AM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. renewable energy industry is reeling from the new coronavirus pandemic, which has delayed construction, put thousands of skilled laborers out of work and sowed doubts about solar and wind projects on the drawing board. In locked-down California, some local agencies that issue...

Study: Wasatch Front fault lines prone to large earthquakes

Apr. 29, 2020 3:13 PM EDT

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Fault lines along the Wasatch Front in north-central Utah are much bigger than initially thought, a study said. The Utah Department of Natural Resources released new maps accompanied with a four-year study showing there is a significant risk in densely populated and developing areas...

Editorial Roundup: New York

Apr. 22, 2020 3:51 PM EDT

Recent editorials of statewide and national interest from New York’s newspapers: Trump’s Immigration Distraction Wall Street Journal April 21 President Trump wants the U.S. economy to reopen soon and take off “like a rocket ship.” Yet now he plans to reduce the human capital necessary...

FILE - In this Saturday, April 11, 2020 file photo, a pack of jackals eats dog food that was left for them by a woman at Hayarkon Park in Tel Aviv, Israel. With a lockdown against the coronavirus crisis, the sprawling park is practically empty. This has cleared the way for packs of jackals to take over this urban oasis in the heart of the city as they search for food. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

As people stay home, Earth turns wilder and cleaner

Apr. 22, 2020 9:13 AM EDT

An unplanned grand experiment is changing Earth. As people across the globe stay home to stop the spread of the new coronavirus, the air has cleaned up, albeit temporarily. Smog stopped choking New Delhi, one of the most polluted cities in the world, and India’s getting views of sights not visible in...