Latest Immunizations News

FILE - In this May 16, 2020, file photo, a billboard is installed on an apartment building encouraging people to wear face masks in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 51st day of a strict government lockdown in a bid to curb the spread of the coronavirus. The pandemic has fractured global relationships as governments act in the interest of their citizens, but John Nkengasong, Africa's top public health official, has helped to steer the continent's 54 countries into an alliance praised as responding better than some richer nations. (AP Photo/Nardus Engelbrecht, File)

The Latest: Online teaching for 3 top Michigan universities

Sep. 24, 2020 6:17 PM EDT

LANSING, Mich. — Leaders of Michigan’s three biggest research universities say online teaching will likely last for the entire academic year, keeping many students out of classrooms until next fall. The presidents of the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Wayne State University...

FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020 file photo, senior Clinical Research Nurse Ajithkumar Sukumaran prepares the COVID 19 vaccine to administer to a volunteer, at a clinic in London. The British government on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020 says it may take part in a study that tries to deliberately infect volunteers who have been given an experimental vaccine against the coronavirus in an effort to more quickly determine if the vaccine works. The approach, called a challenge study, is risky but proponents think it may produce results faster than typical studies, which wait to see if volunteers who have been given an experimental treatment or a dummy version get sick.  (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)

UK may take part in COVID-19 vaccine 'challenge studies'

Sep. 24, 2020 4:37 PM EDT

LONDON (AP) — The British government says it may take part in a study that tries to deliberately infect volunteers who have been given an experimental vaccine against the coronavirus in an effort to more quickly determine if the vaccine works. The approach, called a challenge study, is risky but...

Yin Weidong, CEO of the Chinese pharmaceutical company SinoVac, speaks to journalists during a tour of a vaccine factory in Beijing on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. SinoVac, one of China's pharmaceutical companies behind a leading COVID-19 vaccine candidate says its vaccine will be ready by early 2021 for distribution worldwide, including the U.S. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Chinese company says coronavirus vaccine ready by early 2021

Sep. 24, 2020 11:25 AM EDT

BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese pharmaceutical company said Thursday the coronavirus vaccine it is developing should be ready by early 2021 for distribution worldwide, including the United States. Yin Weidong, the CEO of SinoVac, vowed to apply to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to sell CoronaVac in the...

FILE - In this March 16, 2020, file photo, Neal Browning receives a shot at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle, in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Many world leaders at this week's virtual U.N. summit hope it will be a vaccine made available and affordable to all countries, rich and poor. But with the U.S., China and Russia opting out of a collaborative effort to develop and distribute a vaccine, and some rich nations striking deals with pharmaceutical companies to secure millions of potential doses, the U.N. pleas are plentiful but likely in vain. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

'Are people to be left to die?' Vaccine pleas fill UN summit

Sep. 24, 2020 9:39 AM EDT

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — If the United Nations was created from the ashes of World War II, what will be born from the global crisis of COVID-19? Many world leaders at this week’s virtual U.N. summit hope it will be a vaccine made available and affordable to all countries, rich and poor. But with the...

FILE - In this Tuesday, May 13, 2014 file photo, AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot leaves the British Parliament's Business Innovation and Skills Committee after a hearing in central London. Two firms developing COVID-19 vaccines say pharmaceutical companies are trying to give the public as much information as possible about their testing regimes as drugmakers and public health officials seek to boost confidence that any approved vaccine will be safe. AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot and Paul Stoffels, chief scientific officer of Johnson & Johnson, said Thursday Sept. 24, 2020, that they recognize the coronavirus emergency demands increased transparency from vaccine developers to ensure the public has faith in the end product. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)

Drug companies work jointly to boost vaccine confidence

Sep. 24, 2020 7:32 AM EDT

LONDON (AP) — Two firms developing COVID-19 vaccines say pharmaceutical companies are trying to give the public as much information as possible about their testing regimes as drugmakers and public health officials seek to boost confidence that any approved vaccine will be safe. AstraZeneca CEO Pascal...

Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike, right, reacts before an on-line meeting focused on how to pull off the delayed Tokyo Games, in Tokyo, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. IOC President Thomas Bach delivered a pep talk to Japanese government officials and local organizers on Thursday that included suggestions that “hundreds of millions”of doses COVID-19 vaccines would be available before the postponed Olympic are to open on July 23, 2021. (Du Xiaoyi/Pool Photo via AP)

Bach offers pep session for Tokyo Games and talks up vaccine

Sep. 24, 2020 7:03 AM EDT

TOKYO (AP) — IOC President Thomas Bach delivered a pep talk to Japanese government officials and local organizers on Thursday that included suggestions that “hundreds of millions” of doses COVID-19 vaccines would be available before the postponed Olympics open in July. Bach was speaking from...

A woman wearing a face mask to protect against the coronavirus walks past a shopping mall on a rainy day in Beijing, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. Even as China has largely controlled the outbreak, the coronavirus is still surging across other parts of the world. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

The Latest: China lifts pandemic bar on entry by foreigners

Sep. 23, 2020 11:50 PM EDT

BEIJING — Chinese officials say foreigners holding certain types of visas and residence permits will be permitted to return to China as the threat of the new coronavirus continues to recede. The decision lifts a months-long blanket suspension covering most foreigners apart from diplomats and those in...

Member state flags fly outside the United Nations headquarters during the 75th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. This year's annual gathering of world leaders at U.N. headquarters will be almost entirely

The Latest: Venezuela's Guaidó urges nations to decry Maduro

Sep. 23, 2020 8:11 PM EDT

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The Latest from the U.N. General Assembly (all times EDT): 8:10 p.m. He didn’t get a spot at the U.N. General Assembly. But U.S.-backed Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó still put out his own online message during this year’s gathering of world leaders. On...

Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, testifies during a Senate Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Hearing on the federal government response to COVID-19 on Capitol Hill Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Washington. (Graeme Jennings/Pool via AP)

US experts vow ‘no cutting corners’ as vaccine tests expand

Sep. 23, 2020 7:26 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — A huge international study of a COVID-19 vaccine that aims to work with just one dose is getting underway as top U.S. health officials sought Wednesday to assure a skeptical Congress and public that they can trust any shots the government ultimately approves. Hopes are high that answers...

FILE - In this July 24, 2020, file photo Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Seema Verma speaks during an event with President Donald Trump to sign executive orders on lowering drug prices, in the South Court Auditorium in the White House complex in Washington. Federal officials say a sharp decline in routine medical care for low-income children during the coronavirus shutdown will cause long-term harm if not reversed. A data snapshot released Wednesday by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, found that vaccinations, screening for childhood diseases, visits to the dentist, and even mental health care, dropped precipitously from March through May of this year. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Virus shutdown took a toll on routine health care for kids

Sep. 23, 2020 6:38 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sharp decline in routine medical care for low-income children during the coronavirus shutdown could cause long-term harm if not reversed, federal officials warned Wednesday. A data snapshot from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS, found that vaccinations, screening...