Latest Special interest groups News

Lourdes Sanvicente, 45, left, and a coworker wear protective face masks at the direction of the stand's owner, as they sell tamales, sandwiches, and pastries at a street stand in Mexico City, Wednesday, March 25, 2020. Sanvicente, who doubts the existence of the new coronavirus, says both she and her husband work as street food sellers, together earning 320 pesos (around $13.50) per day to support themselves and their five children.

Coronavirus could hit Mexico's high obesity, diabetes rates

Mar. 25, 2020 8:59 PM EDT

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic could be especially deadly in Mexico because of the country's high rates of obesity and diabetes, a coalition of consumer and health advocacy groups said Wednesday. The Alliance for Food Health said in a report that four of the first five coronavirus deaths in...

FILE - In this July 9, 2015, file photo, a man walks outside the headquarters of Gilead Sciences in Foster City, Calif. Gilead Sciences said Wednesday, March 25, 2020 it will give up the specialty status it received days earlier for its COVID-19 drug amid public outrage that the company was seeking to boost the profits of its treatment. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

Drugmaker backpedals on specialty status for COVID-19 drug

Mar. 25, 2020 3:55 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing public criticism, the maker of a promising coronavirus drug said Wednesday it will waive a special regulatory designation that could have allowed it to block competition and boost profits for its treatment. Gilead Sciences said it will ask U.S. regulators to revoke the so-called...

FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2019, file photo, a worker gets ready to pass out instructions on how to fill out the 2020 census during a town hall meeting in Lithonia, Ga. The U.S. Census Bureau on Wednesday, March 18, 2020, suspended field operations for two weeks, citing the health and safety of its workers and the U.S. public from the novel coronavirus. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)

Census mails out more notices, judge tosses lawsuit by group

Mar. 24, 2020 4:00 PM EDT

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The U.S. Census Bureau has mailed out a second round of notices reminding people to participate in the 2020 census, officials said Tuesday. The bureau also said it now has more than 37,000 temporary workers and hopes to hire as many as 500,000 temporary workers to help with its...

FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2019, file photo, a worker gets ready to pass out instructions on how to fill out the 2020 census during a town hall meeting in Lithonia, Ga. The U.S. Census Bureau on Wednesday, March 18, 2020, suspended field operations for two weeks, citing the health and safety of its workers and the U.S. public from the novel coronavirus. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)

Census Bureau delays deadline for 2020 count by 2 weeks

Mar. 20, 2020 5:55 PM EDT

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The U.S. Census Bureau is delaying the deadline for counting everyone in the U.S. by two weeks because of the spreading novel coronavirus, officials said Friday. The 2020 census had been scheduled to stop at the end of July, but the deadline has now been extended to mid-August, said...

Texas Rangers minor league players Chris Seise, right, and Kevin Mendoza shake hands in greeting in the batting cages Thursday, March 12, 2020, in Surprise, Ariz. Major League Baseball is delaying the start of its season by at least two weeks because of the coronavirus outbreak and has suspended the rest of its spring training game schedule. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Minor league advocacy group demands $15,000 salaries

Mar. 20, 2020 4:04 PM EDT

A collection of former and current players have formed an advocacy group asking that Major League Baseball roughly double salaries in the minors to $15,000 per season. Advocates for Minor Leaguers is led by Garrett Broshuis, a former pitcher and the lawyer who has represented players in lawsuits alleging minor...

Osvaldo Salas, 29, stands with his son outside their home in suburban Phoenix on Wednesday, March 18, 2020. Salas, who isn't proficient in English, says he's disappointed state authorities haven't posted any information on the coronavirus in Spanish and that he has to rely on friends, family and TV for the latest. Salas, a restaurant cook, is worried about supporting his four children if he can't work anymore. (AP Photo/Astrid Galván)

Getting coronavirus updates in Spanish is a mixed bag in US

Mar. 18, 2020 11:50 PM EDT

PHOENIX (AP) — Osvaldo Salas speaks a little English, but not proficiently. The suburban Phoenix man relies on Spanish-language TV and friends and family for information on the coronavirus because state and local officials haven't posted any updates online in Spanish even as the global pandemic widens. ...

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with tourism industry executives about the coronavirus, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, March 17, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump mulls sending all who cross border illegally to Mexico

Mar. 17, 2020 11:56 PM EDT

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Trump administration is considering a plan to turn back all people who cross the border illegally from Mexico, two administration officials said Tuesday, using powers they say the president has during pandemics like the coronavirus outbreak to mount what would be one of the most...

FILE - In this July 26, 2016, file photo, journalists gather in front of Tsukui Yamayuri-en, a facility for the handicapped where a former care home employee killed disabled people, in Sagamihara, outside Tokyo. The Yokohama District Court sentenced Satoshi Uematsu, 30, to death Monday, March 16, 2020, for killing 19 disabled people and injuring 24 others four years ago in the deadliest mass attack in postwar Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

Worker at Japan care home sentenced to hang for mass killing

Mar. 16, 2020 8:42 AM EDT

TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese court on Monday sentenced a former care home employee to hang for knifing to death 19 disabled people and injuring two dozen others in the deadliest mass attack in post World War II Japan. The Yokohama District Court convicted Satoshi Uematsu of the killings and of injuring 24...

FILE - In this March 3, 2020, file photo people photograph the signage outside the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office in Tukwila, Wash., that was closed due to concerns about the coronavirus. The U.S. government says a new rule disqualifying more people from green cards if they use government benefits will not apply to immigrants with symptoms of the illness caused by coronavirus who seek care. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said late Friday, March 13, 2020, that seeking treatment or preventive services will not impact someone's immigration status under the new public charge rule, which took effect last month. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times via AP, File)/The Seattle Times via AP)

US: Immigrants can seek coronavirus care without fear

Mar. 13, 2020 10:43 PM EDT

PHOENIX (AP) — The U.S. government says a new rule disqualifying more people from green cards if they use government benefits will not apply to immigrants with coronavirus or virus symptoms if they seek care. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said late Friday that seeking treatment or preventive...

FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2019, file photo, Luis, left, a migrant fleeing gang violence in Michoacan, sits with his 13-year-old son on a bench in a public park facing a tent camp for refugees in Juarez, Mexico. Luis' family has lived in the camp for two months while they wait to apply for asylum in the U.S., at a border crossing about a quarter of a mile away. The Supreme Court on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, said it would allow the Trump administration to continue enforcing a policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings, despite lower court rulings that the policy probably is illegal. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio, File)

Justices allow 'Remain in Mexico' asylum policy to continue

Mar. 11, 2020 3:11 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday said it would allow the Trump administration to continue enforcing a policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings, despite lower court rulings that the policy probably is illegal. The justices' order, over a dissenting vote by...