Latest State taxes News

Editorial Roundup: US

Jul. 1, 2020 3:10 PM EDT

Excerpts from recent editorials in the United States and abroad: ___ June 30 The Wall Street Journal on allegations that Russia offered bounties for killing American troops in Afghanistan: It is going to be something to behold, on Jan. 21, 2021, when President Biden takes revenge on Russia for paying the Taliban...

In a August 28, 2018 photo, Bangor Christian Schools sophomore Olivia Carson, 15, of Glenburn was dropped off on the first day of school by her mother, Amy Carson in Bangor. The Carsons are one of three Maine families that are challenging the prohibition on using public money to pay tuition at religious schools after a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision. States can’t cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education, a divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, June 30, 2020. Two states with existing private education programs, Maine and Vermont, could see quick efforts to force them to allow religious schools to participate. (Gabor Degre/The Bangor Daily News via AP)

Maine, Vermont next in fight over aid to religious schools

Jul. 1, 2020 11:45 AM EDT

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A U.S. Supreme Court decision that says states can’t cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education could breathe new life into efforts to force Maine and Vermont to help fund religious educations. A lawsuit by three families in Maine who...

The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, early Monday, June 15, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Supreme Court lifts ban on state aid to religious schooling

Jun. 30, 2020 1:11 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — States can't cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education, a divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. By a 5-4 vote with the conservatives in the majority, the justices upheld a Montana scholarship program that allows state tax credits for private...

FILE - In this June 28, 2018, file photo, State Sen. Bob Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, left, and Assemblyman Ed Chau, D-Arcadia, right, celebrate with Alastair Mactaggart, center, after the Legislature approved their data privacy bill in Sacramento, Calif. California voters will decide a ballot measure this November that would give them more power over how companies use their data, an extension of a landmark privacy law passed in 2018. Secretary of State Alex Padilla announced Wednesday, June 25, 2020, a measure to amend the law will be on the Nov. 3 general election ballot. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Data privacy, other measures qualify for California ballot

Jun. 26, 2020 12:38 AM EDT

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California voters will weigh in this November on whether to expand a landmark data privacy law, alter a decades-old law that limits property taxes on businesses and exempt ride-hail giants Uber and Lyft from a new state labor law. They are among 11 measures Secretary of State Alex...

FILE - In this June 23, 2020, file photo orange barriers enclose chairs and tables that will be used for dining along Sixth Street between Liberty and Penn avenues in downtown Pittsburgh. A report by Moody’s Analytics, a private sector economic research firm, released Wednesday, June 24, is warning anew of continuing damage to the economy if Washington doesn’t deliver several hundred billion dollars in budget relief to states and local governments amid the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

Report: State, local aid needed to avert 4 million layoffs

Jun. 24, 2020 6:38 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new private sector report is warning anew of continuing damage to the economy if Washington doesn’t deliver several hundred billion dollars in budget relief to states and local governments amid the coronavirus pandemic. But Wednesday’s report by Moody’s Analytics, a...

FILE - In this Thursday, March 19, 2020, file photo, a public school employee sanitizes a sink in a bathroom at a U.S. high school. Jobs with state and city governments are usually a source of stability in the U.S. economy, but the financial devastation wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has forced cuts that will reduce public services, from schools to trash pickup. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

Government job losses are piling up, and it could get worse

Jun. 6, 2020 11:20 AM EDT

Jobs with state and city governments are usually a source of stability in the U.S. economy, but the financial devastation wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has forced cuts that will reduce public services — from schools to trash pickup. Even as the U.S. added some jobs in May, the number of people...

In this May 11, 2020 photo, President Donald Trump points to a question as he speaks about the coronavirus during a press briefing in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Trump has many targets in his war against the media but perhaps none more surprising than the Voice of America, the venerable U.S.-government funded institution created during WWII and expanded during the Cold War to broadcast independent news and promote democracy and American values to the world. In a series of attacks, Trump and his supporters have accused the outlet of “disgraceful” reporting. They're now pushing hard to install their choice to run the agency that oversees VOA and its affiliates. That battle is about to hit Congress, where partisan lines have already been drawn over fears the administration wants to turn them into Trump propaganda machines. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Senate confirms Trump's pick to lead Voice of America

Jun. 4, 2020 7:09 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Senate voted along party lines Thursday to confirm President Donald Trump’s choice to head the Voice of America and other U.S. government-funded international broadcasters that have been the subject of harsh criticism from the White House. Despite significant Democratic...

FILE - In this Sunday, March 22, 2020, file photo, Gov. Gina Raimondo gives an update on the coronavirus during a news conference, in Providence, R.I. Many states have yet to spend the federal funding they got to help with soaring costs related to the coronavirus crisis, making it tougher for states and cities to argue that they need hundreds of billions more from U.S. taxpayers. “If I knew today that another billion dollars was coming to Rhode Island to help solve our budget deficit, I’d spend the $1.25 billion now,” Raimondo said about the state's portion of money. “Lots of other governors are spending. They’re taking a gamble, and I’m just not ready to do that yet.” (Kris Craig/Providence Journal via AP, Pool, File)

While asking for more, states are slow to spend virus aid

May. 31, 2020 9:52 AM EDT

Many states have yet to spend the federal funding they received more than a month ago to help with soaring costs related to the coronavirus crisis, complicating governors' arguments that they need hundreds of billions more from U.S. taxpayers. The Associated Press reviewed plans from governors or lawmakers on how...

First grade teachers, Ellie Morgan, 25, left, Hannah Sprayberry, 28, right, pose for a portrait, and say they are taking around 5 per-cent pay cut on Thursday, May 28, 2020, in Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. With sharp declines in state spending projected because of the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic, America's more than 13,000 local school systems are wrestling with the likelihood of big budget cuts. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Schools nationwide brace for cuts from new financial crisis

May. 30, 2020 8:14 AM EDT

ATLANTA (AP) — It was during the Great Recession when Catoosa County first shortened its school year, from 180 to 175 instructional days, as it began years of furloughs due to budget cuts. As a result of the coronavirus pandemic, the next school year will be shorter still, with only 170 classroom days. ...

FILE - This Feb. 10, 2020, file photo shows slot machines at the Hard Rock casino in Atlantic City,N.J., that are controlled by gamblers over the internet. The coronavirus pandemic could lead to a quicker expansion of sports betting and internet gambling in the U.S. as states deal with huge budget deficits and look for new tax revenue wherever they can find it. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry, FIle)

Virus could lead more states to OK sports, online betting

May. 29, 2020 12:13 PM EDT

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic could lead to a quicker expansion of sports betting and internet gambling in the U.S. as states deal with huge budget deficits and look for new tax revenue wherever they can find it. Most major sports remain shut down due to the virus, but European soccer...