Latest Medical research News

FILE - In this Nov. 30, 1999, file photo, Seattle police use tear gas to push back World Trade Organization protesters in downtown Seattle. The Associated Press found that there is no government oversight of the manufacture and use of tear gas. Instead, the industry is left to regulate itself. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)

Lack of study and oversight raises concerns about tear gas

Aug. 6, 2020 1:16 AM EDT

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On June 2, Justin LaFrancois attended a protest against police violence and racism in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, where he planned to livestream the event for his alternative newspaper’s website. Shortly into the march, police, who reported that water bottles and rocks...

FILE - In this July 26, 2020, file photo, federal officers launch tear gas at demonstrators during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse in Portland, Ore. The Associated Press found that there is no government oversight of the manufacture and use of tear gas. Instead, the industry is left to regulate itself. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Lack of study and oversight raises concerns about tear gas

Aug. 6, 2020 1:14 AM EDT

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On June 2, Justin LaFrancois attended a protest against police violence and racism in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, where he planned to livestream the event for his alternative newspaper’s website. Shortly into the march, police, who reported that water bottles and rocks...

Fargo company conducting COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials

Aug. 5, 2020 7:41 AM EDT

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — A medical research company in Fargo will conduct two clinical trials that could lead to a vaccine for COVID-19. Lillestol Research is among several facilities across the nation participating in “Operation Warp Speed,” the federal government’s plan to provide 300...

People wearing face masks to help protect against the spread of the new coronavirus pass on a crosswalk on a street in Tokyo, Tuesday, Aug, 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

The Latest: Japan governor touts gargling product for virus

Aug. 4, 2020 11:22 PM EDT

TOKYO — A governor in Japan is drawing skeptical criticism after he touted a gargling product as effective against the coronavirus, an assertion that, despite its dubiousness, emptied some store shelves of the medicine. Shares of Shionogi & Co. and Meiji Holdings Co., which make Isojin, soared in Tokyo...

Cancer researcher creates comics to explain science

Aug. 1, 2020 3:05 AM EDT

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A stalk of celery got Jaye Gardiner into science. As a precocious first grader in Chicago, she was invited to take part in a second-grade science class, where the students were conducting an experiment. Gardiner, who’d always been intrigued by science, was...

Two employees of the Ryugyong Health Complex disinfect the hands and check the fever of people coming to the complex to help curb the spread of the coronavirus, in Pyongyang, North Korea, Friday, July 31, 2020. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)

The Latest: SKorea holds leader of church with virus cluster

Jul. 31, 2020 11:57 PM EDT

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korean prosecutors have arrested the elderly leader of a secretive religious sect as part of an investigation into allegations the church hampered the government’s anti-corfonavirus response after thousands of worshipers were infected in February and March. Prosecutors are...

FILE - In this June 16, 2020, file photo, French President Emmanuel Macron listens to a researcher as he visits an industrial development laboratory at French drugmaker's vaccine unit Sanofi Pasteur plant in Marcy-l'Etoile, near Lyon, central France. As the race for a vaccine against the new coronavirus intensifies, many rich countries are rushing to the front of the line by placing advance orders for the inevitably limited supply to guarantee their citizens are immunized first. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani, Pool)

US sinks another $2.1 billion into a potential vaccine

Jul. 31, 2020 12:47 PM EDT

LONDON (AP) — Pharma giants GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi Pasteur have announced they will supply 100 million doses of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine to the United States as governments buy up supplies in hopes of securing a candidate that works. The United States will pay up to $2.1 billion “for...

In this April 2020 photo provided by The Wound Treatment Center, two COVID-19 patients are treated in hyperbaric chambers at a hospital in Opelousas, La. The therapy involves delivering 100% oxygen straight to patients inside a pressurized chamber. (Marcus Speyrer/The Wound Treatment Center via AP)

Doctors try pressurized oxygen chambers in COVID fight

Jul. 31, 2020 10:02 AM EDT

As a New York University medical researcher who works once a week in an emergency room, Dr. David Lee had the luxury of time to think like a scientist while also treating coronavirus patients whose lungs kept giving out. In every case, he saw the same thing: Their blood was starved of oxygen. One day an idea hit...

Leon McFarlane a research technician handles a blood sample from a volunteer in the laboratory at Imperial College in London, Thursday, July 30, 2020. Imperial College is working on the development of a COVID-19 vaccine. Scientists at Imperial College London say they are immunizing hundreds of people with an experimental coronavirus vaccine in an early trial after seeing no worrying safety problems in those vaccinated so far. Dr. Robin Shattock told the Associated Press that he and colleagues had just finished a very slow and arduous process of testing the vaccine at a low dose in a small number of participants and would now be expanding the trial to about 300 people, including those over 75. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

UK scientists to immunize hundreds with coronavirus vaccine

Jul. 30, 2020 3:50 PM EDT

LONDON (AP) — Scientists at Imperial College London say they are immunizing hundreds of people with an experimental coronavirus vaccine in an early trial after seeing no worrying safety problems in a small number vaccinated so far. Dr. Robin Shattock, a professor at the college, told The Associated Press...

In this image from video provided by Washington University, researcher Nicolas Barthelemy works on a p-tau217 test for Alzheimer's disease at a laboratory in St. Louis, Mo., on Monday, July 27, 2020. Several companies and universities have developed versions of these tests, which look for a form of tau protein, one of the substances that can build up and damage the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. (Huy Mach/University of Washington via AP)

Scientists get closer to blood test for Alzheimer's disease

Jul. 28, 2020 1:11 PM EDT

An experimental blood test was highly accurate at distinguishing people with Alzheimer’s disease from those without it in several studies, boosting hopes that there soon may be a simple way to help diagnose this most common form of dementia. Developing such a test has been a long-sought goal, and...