Law eliminates license suspension for non-moving violations

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Gov. J.B. Pritzker has signed a law that eliminates driver's license suspensions for most non-moving violations.

The Democrat signed the “License to Work Act” last week. It takes effect July.

Prizter says it will allow tens of thousands of motorists to have driving privileges reinstated. That means more people will be able to work

"Illinois now recognizes the fact that suspending licenses for having too many unpaid tickets, fines, and fees doesn’t necessarily make a person pay the bill, but it does mean that people don’t have a way to pay,” Pritzker said.

He said license suspensions are too harsh a penalty for “a practice that reinforces cycles of instability.”

Authorities suspend yearly more than 50,000 licenses belonging to people who can't afford to pay tickets, fines and fees.

“Using license suspension for debt collection is cruel, counterproductive and frankly embarrassing,” said Chicago Democratic Sen. Omar Aquino, a sponsor of the measure.

According to Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, a study showed that 42% of those who had their licenses suspended lost their jobs.

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