Nevada News Digest

Good afternoon. Here’s a new, updated look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up in Nevada.

Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the Las Vegas bureau at (702) 382-7440 or aplasvegas@ap.org

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change.

Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date. All times are Pacific.

Some TV and radio stations will receive broadcast versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

TOP STORIES:

AMERICA PROTESTS-NEVADA

LAS VEGAS — A police officer was on life support Tuesday after being shot during a protest on the Las Vegas Strip and a man who a federal official said was armed with a rifle was hit with a beanbag projectile and then fatally shot by officers protecting a federal courthouse, authorities said. The wounded officer was in “grave condition” at University Medical Center in Las Vegas and the suspect in his shooting was taken into custody early Tuesday. By Ken Ritter. SENT: 620 words, AP Photos. UPCOMING: Updates on merit.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-NEVADA ELECTION

RENO, Nev. — A federal judge has put off until next month any decisions about the legality of the temporary rules for next week’s primary election in Nevada. That means any further rulings on the constitutional nature of the mail-in format will not apply until the general election in November. By Scott Sonner. SENT: 560 words.

STOLEN WWII FLAG RETURNED

RENO, Nev. — A flag from a World War II battleship stolen from its display Saturday after people broke into Reno City Hall amid protests over the death of George Floyd was anonymously returned Tuesday. City spokesman Jon Humbert confirmed the glass display case that held the U.S.S. Reno flag was smashed during demonstrations protesting Floyd’s death in Minnesota. SENT: 300 words.

IN BRIEF:

— VOTER REGISTRATION NUMBERS: Nevada Republicans out-registered Democrats for the second month in a row, according to the secretary of state’s office.

— DRUG TESTING-PLEA: A Las Vegas man who worked as a supervisor at a contractor facility that tested for drug use has pleaded guilty to accepting bribes to falsify urinalysis results provided to federal probation officials.

SPORTS:

BBO--VIRUS OUTBREAK-BASEBALL

NEW YORK — Baseball owners and players have reverted to form -- the type displayed over the past half-century during eight work stoppages filled with salary squabbles. Players proposed to resume the sport in the coronavirus pandemic with a 114-game regular season and full prorated salaries, leaving each player with approximately 70% of what he had been slated to earn. By Ronald Blum. SENT: 830 words, photos.

BKO—HALL OF FAME-BRYANT INDUCTION

The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame was gearing up for a great year: not just the certain election of NBA superstars like Kobe Bryant, Kevin Garnett and Tim Duncan, but also a chance to unveil a completely renovated museum. Because of the coronavirus outbreak, the reopening has been pushed back two months to July 1 and the induction ceremony is being postponed, either to October or the spring. By Jimmy Golen. SENT: 640 words, photos.

FBN—OFFSEASON UPDATE: PLAYING FOOTBALL

Call it support or call it pressure. Regardless, the NFL is likely to get plenty of calls to play games on schedule — from broadcast partners, from municipalities, from sponsors, and certainly from fans. By Pro Football Writer Barry Wilner. SENT: 700 words.

HKN—HOCKEY AFTER QUARANTINE

No sport relies on chemistry and cohesion among teammates like hockey, and the potential of several months without practices will undoubtedly affect what the NHL looks like if it returns this season. General managers and coaches believe players will adapt. By Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno. SENT: 840 words.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-STADIUMS-DISTANCING

LAWRENCE, Kan. — It used to be that empty seats caused palpitations among team owners and college administrators relying on ticket sales and concessions to beef up the profit margins. Now, those empty seats — and short lines and clear concourses — will be the norm for a while as sports grapples with social distancing requirements. By Dave Skretta. SENT: 830 words, Photos.

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