Latest Environmental science News

To capture catfish forced to the surface by a low-frequency electric current, researchers in a fast chase boat swoop in with dip nets to scoop them up before they get away, Wednesday, June 10, 2020 near Leon, W.Va. (John McCoy/Charleston Gazette-Mail via AP)

Researchers use 'shocking' method to capture catfish

Jul. 4, 2020 10:01 AM EDT

LEON, W.Va. (AP) — With its two spider-like electrodes dangling into the water, the big boat idled along slowly. “There!” one of the men on the boat yelled, pointing toward a spot 20 yards away where a catfish skittered across the surface. A smaller boat zoomed toward the fish, and a man in...

In this undated photo, Gus Smith arrived in Jackson, Wyo., in Jan. 2020, from Minnesota's Superior National Forest, and is now working as Grand Teton National Park's chief of science and resource management. He  replaced Sue Consolo-Murphy, who retired. (Ryan Dorgan/Jackson Hole News & Guide via AP)/

New Grand Teton science chief followed unconventional path

Jul. 4, 2020 8:10 AM EDT

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — Gus Smith was walking his German shorthair not far from his Moose home one Saturday in late May when euphoria flew by in a flock. Fellow birders would best appreciate his experience. Out on foot near the Chapel of Transfiguration, Smith suddenly found himself engulfed by black rosy...

This 2014 microscope photo provided by Dr. F. Dahlke shows 1.5 mm diameter eggs of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Global warming looks like it will be a far bigger problem for the world’s fish species than scientists first thought, since a study led by Dahlke released on Thursday, July 2, 2020 shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are far more vulnerable to hotter water. (Dr. F. Dahlke via AP)

Fish more vulnerable to warming water than first thought

Jul. 2, 2020 2:05 PM EDT

Global warming looks like it will be a bigger problem for the world’s fish species than scientists first thought: A new study shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are more vulnerable to hotter water. With medium-level human-caused climate change expected by the end of the century, the...

In this June 20, 2019, photo, Dr. Greg Foy, left, and his wife Leigh Foy discuss their upcoming climate change workshop during an interview at their home in Spring Garden Township, Pa. (Dawn J. Sagert/York Dispatch via AP)

Science education standards could get rewrite

Jun. 20, 2020 11:31 AM EDT

YORK, Pa. (AP) — A group of educators from throughout the state aims to overhaul some of the country's oldest standards for science education, all while avoiding a protracted political dispute over climate change and evolution. Pennsylvania's science standards haven't changed since 2002, and repeated...

Study identifies lakes at risk of illegal fish introduction

Jun. 14, 2020 8:11 AM EDT

KALISPELL, Mont. (AP) — A recent study found a way to identify lakes and other bodies of water in northwest Montana that are at high risk of illegal fish introductions, which can threaten native species. The study will allow state fish managers to improve patrols in high risk areas. Standing next to...

In this undated photo provided by the World Food Prize Foundation, Rattan Lal, a professor of soil science at The Ohio State University poses at the University in Columbus, Ohio. Lai was named the recipient of the 2020 World Food Prize on Thursday, June 11, 2020. He was recognized by the Des Moines, Iowa-based organization for his soil research which has led to improved food production and a better understanding of how atmospheric carbon can be held in the soil improving climate change.(World Food Prize Foundation via AP)

Ohio State University soil professor gets World Food Prize

Jun. 11, 2020 2:15 PM EDT

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A soil scientist whose research led to improved food production and a better understanding of how atmospheric carbon can be held in the soil to help combat climate change was named this year’s recipient of the World Food Prize on Thursday. Rattan Lal is a professor of soil...

FILE - Swimmers enjoy the sea and the sun at Alimos beach, near Athens, on Saturday, May 16, 2020. The quality of bathing waters in Europe remains high according to a study released by the EU environment agency on Monday, June 8, 2020, concluding that minimum water quality standards were met at 95 percent of the sites monitored across the continent last year. (AP Photo/Yorgos Karahalis, File)

Report: European bathing water quality remains high

Jun. 8, 2020 9:19 AM EDT

BRUSSELS (AP) — The quality of bathing waters in Europe remains high according to a study by the EU environment agency that found that minimum water quality standards were met at 95 percent of the sites monitored across the continent last year. The European Environment Agency, or EEA, said on Monday that...

Dead zone prediction: Larger than average; not near record

Jun. 3, 2020 11:50 AM EDT

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — High rivers and high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus from farm and urban runoff mean a larger than average oxygen-starved “dead zone” is likely this year in the Gulf of Mexico, researchers said Wednesday. But the predicted area for an area with too little oxygen for...

Wisconsin hunters allowed to kill 10 elk, same as last year

May. 27, 2020 11:54 AM EDT

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — There will be no change in the number of elk that hunters can kill in Wisconsin this year, after the state Department of Natural Resources Board on Wednesday voted to keep the limit at 10. The board voted 5-2 to set the limit at the same as it was the last two seasons, going against...

Maine to collect ocean acidification data with new sensors

May. 24, 2020 2:24 PM EDT

BOOTHBAY HARBOR, Maine (AP) — Maine marine officials said three new sensors installed in a coastal community will help scientists get a better understanding of ocean acidifcation. The growing acid levels in the ocean are a hazard for some kinds of sea life, including some of those sought by Maine...