Latest Freshwater biology News

Cape Coral canals are helping researchers find what works

Sep. 19, 2020 3:01 AM EDT

CAPE CORAL, Fla. (AP) — Scientists and officials are using Cape Coral’s cyanobacteria slicks as a living laboratory to test ways to fight freshwater algae blooms with potentially global impact. A team including city staff and nationally prominent researchers have deployed a variety of algae-fighting...

Green River stocked with 2,400 endangered mussels

Sep. 15, 2020 3:28 AM EDT

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources has stocked about 2,400 endangered freshwater mussels into the Green River. A statement from the agency said about half were placed into the river within Mammoth Cave National Park earlier this month and the other half were placed...

Endangered trout species thriving in remote Nevada lake

Aug. 16, 2020 11:18 AM EDT

RENO, Nev. (AP) — A half-century after being added to the endangered species list, Lahontan cutthroat trout are thriving with help from a Native American tribe at a remote lake in northern Nevada. For nearly a decade, members of the Summit Lake Paiute Tribe and scientists at the Global Water Center at the...

FILE - In this April 2, 2015, file photo, Gene Dasher, left, and Frankie Crosby, center, use wire baskets on the end of 14-foot handles to tong oysters while Misty Crosby separates clumps of oysters at Apalachicola Bay, near Eastpoint, Fla. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation will shut down wild oyster harvesting for as long as five years. The Commissioners hope that the pause and $20 million in restoration and monitoring, will restore a portion of the oyster fishery. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser, File)

To save the Apalachicola oyster fishery, shut it down

Aug. 8, 2020 1:31 PM EDT

APALACHICOLA, Fla. (AP) — The tourism video opens with a scene of boats, birds and blue water, lit by a postcard dawn. “If you’re looking to do the real Florida, look no further,” a deep-voiced narrator says. “We’re in Apalachicola Bay, where the birds are four-feet tall,...

In this May 15, 2019, file photo, the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River is seen from the air near Colfax, Washington. The federal government said Friday, July 31, 2020, four giant dams on the Snake River in Washington state will not be removed to help endangered salmon migrate to the ocean. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

US: Snake River dams will not be removed to save salmon

Jul. 31, 2020 3:18 PM EDT

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The U.S. government announced Friday that four huge dams on the Snake River in Washington state will not be removed to help endangered salmon migrate to the ocean. The decision thwarts the desires of environmental groups that fought for two decades to breach the structures. The Final...