Latest Animal health News

Bears waive cornerback Amukamara, receiver Gabriel

Feb. 21, 2020 5:22 PM EST

LAKE FOREST, Ill. (AP) — The Chicago Bears waived cornerback Prince Amukamara and speedy receiver Taylor Gabriel on Friday. Amukamara started 42 games over the past three seasons and gave the Bears a physical presence in the backfield while helping the defense emerge as a top-10 unit. He was limited by a...

In this Feb. 14, 2020 photo, Egyptian Vets for Animal Care, the country's first spay and neuter program, mark a puppy with red paint after giving it a rabies shot,  in Cairo, Egypt. After centuries of stigma, the street dogs of Egypt are finding popular acceptance. Grassroots support like sterilization, medical care and shelter has surged in defiance of a government extermination policy. For decades, Cairo dealt with its stray animal problem by leaving poison in the streets.  (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

Egypt's once-reviled street dogs get chance at a better life

Feb. 20, 2020 12:43 AM EST

CAIRO (AP) — Karim Hegazi spends his days in a Cairo clinic taking care of animals long considered a menace in Egypt. Stray dogs roam in almost every Cairo neighborhood — lurking in construction sites, scavenging through trash and howling nightly atop parked cars. The government says there's around...

In this Friday, Feb. 14, 2020 photo, Dr. Robert Bayer holds a jar of frozen lobster blood in his lab in Orono, Maine. Bayer's company, Lobster Unlimited of Orono, is investigating whether lobster blood can be used as a potential weapon against viruses and cancer, and representatives said results are promising. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued the company a patent in late October related to its work. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Claws of health? Lobster blood could play role in new drugs

Feb. 19, 2020 12:01 PM EST

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Maine lobsters have long delighted tourists as the state's most beloved seafood. But one company thinks the crustaceans can save human lives by providing their blood for use in new drugs. The effort, involving a longtime lobster scientist, wouldn't be the first example of coastal...

FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2020, file photo provided by the Anti-Poaching Special Squad, police look at items seized from store suspected of trafficking wildlife in Guangde city in central China's Anhui Province. As China enforces a temporary ban on the wildlife trade to contain the outbreak of a new virus, many are calling for a more permanent solution before disaster strikes again. (Anti-Poaching Special Squad via AP, File)

Virus renews safety concerns about slaughtering wild animals

Feb. 14, 2020 4:14 PM EST

BEIJING (AP) — China cracked down on the sale of exotic species after an outbreak of a new virus in 2002 was linked to markets selling live animals. The germ turned out to be a coronavirus that caused SARS. The ban was later lifted, and the animals reappeared. Now another coronavirus is spreading through...

Workers pack bottles of alcohol disinfectant in a factory in Suining in southwest China's Sichuan province Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020. China's daily death toll from a new virus topped 100 for the first time and pushed the total past 1,000 dead, authorities said Tuesday after leader Xi Jinping visited a health center to rally public morale amid little sign the contagion is abating. (Chinatopix Via AP) CHINA OUT

New name for disease caused by virus outbreak: COVID-19

Feb. 11, 2020 1:20 PM EST

LONDON (AP) — The disease caused by a new virus that emerged late last year in China and has since sickened tens of thousands of people now has an official name: COVID-19. At a press briefing on Tuesday, the World Health Organization said it had decided on the name after consulting with the Food and...

Dead birds posing as cat food confiscated at Dulles airport

Feb. 11, 2020 5:23 AM EST

CHANTILLY, Va. (AP) — A package of tiny dead birds passed off as pet food was confiscated by Customs agents at a Virginia airport. U.S. Customs and Border Protection says the package came in to Dulles International Airport on a flight from Beijing on Jan. 27. Agents discovered the bag of dead birds in the...

In this Oct. 29, 2018, photo, Jeff Schwartzkopf, of Rudd, Iowa, looks at the concentrated animal feeding operation, or CAFO, built near his home in Rudd, Iowa. Jeff and Gail Schwartzkopf say their lives changed drastically after a hog operation was built a quarter-mile from their home in northern Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Factory farms provide abundant food, but environment suffers

Feb. 6, 2020 12:36 PM EST

AKRON, Iowa (AP) — In recent years, Fred Zenk built two barns housing about 2,400 hogs between them — long, white, concrete-and-metal structures that are ubiquitous in the Midwestern countryside. The Iowa farmer didn’t follow state requirements to get construction approval and file a manure...

In this Oct. 29, 2018, photo, Jeff Schwartzkopf, of Rudd, Iowa, looks at the concentrated animal feeding operation, or CAFO, built near his home in Rudd, Iowa. Jeff and Gail Schwartzkopf say their lives changed drastically after a hog operation was built a quarter-mile from their home in northern Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Factory farms provide abundant food, but environment suffers

Feb. 6, 2020 12:19 PM EST

AKRON, Iowa (AP) — In recent years, Fred Zenk built two barns housing about 2,400 hogs between them — long, white, concrete-and-metal structures that are ubiquitous in the Midwestern countryside. The Iowa farmer didn’t follow state requirements to get construction approval and file a manure...

Sick Hawaiian monk seal has infection spread by feral cats

Feb. 5, 2020 2:38 PM EST

HONOLULU (AP) — A sick Hawaiian monk seal under the care of wildlife scientists is suffering from a parasitic infection often spread via feral cat feces, officials said. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials determined that the seal suffering from toxoplasmosis, the Honolulu...

In this April 2016 photo provided by the United States Department of Agriculture, detector canine

Dog sleuths sniff out crop disease hitting citrus trees

Feb. 3, 2020 9:26 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dog detectives might be able to help save ailing citrus groves, research published Monday suggests. Scientists trained dogs to sniff out a crop disease called citrus greening that has hit orange, lemon and grapefruit orchards in Florida, California and Texas. The dogs can detect it weeks...