Latest Biochemistry News

FILE - In this Saturday, June 18, 2005 file photo, identical twins Alf, left, and Sven Fehnhanhn, left background, 79, from Kassel, pose along with seven-month-old Luis Carl, right, und Albert Frank Millgramm, right background, during a twins' meeting in Berlin. According to research published on Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021, identical twins are not exactly genetically the same. (AP Photo/Jockel Finck)

Identical twins aren't perfect clones, research shows

Jan. 7, 2021 11:31 AM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you’re an identical twin who’s always resisted being called a clone of your sibling, scientists say you have a point. Identical twins are not exactly genetically the same, new research shows. Scientists in Iceland sequenced DNA from 387 pairs of identical twins —...

In this Friday, March 13, 2020 photo provided by Regneron, members of the Infectious Disease team celebrate at their lab in New York state after confirming cells from Singapore are viable and that some make antibodies that bind to the coronavirus, suggesting they may have the potential to block it. (Regeneron via AP)

One company's quest for an antibody drug to fight COVID-19

Dec. 21, 2020 12:05 AM EST

On a Saturday afternoon in March as COVID-19 was bearing down on New York City, a dozen scientists anxiously crowded around a computer in a suburban drug company’s lab. They had spent weeks frantically getting blood from early survivors across the globe and from mice with human-like immune systems —...

FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020 file photo, blood samples from volunteers participating in the last-stage testing of the COVID-19 vaccine by Moderna and the National Institutes wait to be processed in a lab at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Miami. Creating vaccines and properly testing them less than a year after the world discovered a never-before-seen disease is incredible. But the two U.S. frontrunners are made in a way that promises speedier development may become the norm -- especially if they prove to work long-term as well as they have in early testing. (AP Photo/Taimy Alvarez, File)

Years of research laid groundwork for speedy COVID-19 shots

Dec. 7, 2020 5:15 PM EST

How could scientists race out COVID-19 vaccines so fast without cutting corners? A head start helped -- over a decade of behind-the-scenes research that had new vaccine technology poised for a challenge just as the coronavirus erupted. “The speed is a reflection of years of work that went before,”...