Latest Biodiversity News

FILE - In this March 11, 2020, file photo, Myrtle Felton, from left, Sharon Lavigne, Gail LeBoeuf and Rita Cooper, members of RISE St. James, conduct a live stream video on property owned by Formosa in St. James Parish, La.  The Army Corps of Engineers has suspended its permit for the Chinese conglomerate’s $9.4 billion plastics complex on a technicality, but says it may review other aspects of the permit. The Corps says it incorrectly dismissed sites in Ascension Parish when it reviewed whether other potential sites might have fewer environmental effects than the company's chosen location in St. James Parish. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Corps suspends $9.4B plastics complex permit for review

Nov. 16, 2020 2:36 PM EST

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Army Corps of Engineers has suspended its permit for a Chinese conglomerate’s $9.4 billion plastics complex on a technicality but says it may also review other aspects of the permit. The notice filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., did not mention the...

Lawsuit planned over hunting, fishing at US wildlife refuges

Oct. 28, 2020 4:47 PM EDT

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The Trump administration is violating the Endangered Species Act by expanding hunting and fishing by 3,600 square miles (9,300 square kilometers) on the national wildlife refuge system and national fish hatchery system, an environmental group says. The Center for Biological Diversity on...

DELETES REFERENCE TO SOLANO COUNTY - California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference at Sierra Orchards walnut farm in Winters, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday to protect nearly a third of California’s land and coastal waters in his latest effort to fight climate change that he has blamed for recent record-breaking wildfires. (Renée C. Byer/The Sacramento Bee via AP, Pool)

California governor calls for protecting 30% of state land

Oct. 7, 2020 10:44 PM EDT

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday to protect nearly a third of California’s land and coastal waters in his latest effort to fight climate change that he has blamed for recent record-breaking wildfires. He directed state agencies to pursue actions that will use...

In this June 2017 photo taken in the ACE Basin region of South Carolina and provided by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, a male black rail offers an insect to a female as part of their courtship behaviors. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared the Eastern black rail a threatened species on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, but stopped short of the stronger protections some environmentalists were seeking for the elusive bird now imperiled by habitat destruction, sea level rise, and the increasing frequency and intensity of storms with climate change.  (Christy Hand/South Carolina Department of Natural Resources via AP)

Elusive eastern black rail threatened by rising sea levels

Oct. 7, 2020 5:05 PM EDT

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared the Eastern black rail a threatened species on Wednesday, but stopped short of the stronger protections some environmentalists were seeking for the elusive bird, now imperiled by habitat destruction, sea level rise, and the increasing frequency and intensity of storms...

FILE - In this Dec. 21, 2012, file photo, Big John the Tasmanian devil growls from the confines of his tree house as he makes his first appearance at the Wild Life Sydney Zoo in Sydney. Tasmanian devils, the carnivorous marsupials whose feisty, frenzied eating habits won the animals cartoon fame, have returned to mainland Australia for the first time in some 3,000 years. Conservation groups have recently released some cancer-free devils in a wildlife refuge on the mainland, and they plan to release more in the coming years. Their hope is that the species will thrive and improve the biodiversity.  (AP Photo/Rob Griffith, File)

Feisty Tasmanian devils roaming Australian mainland again

Oct. 7, 2020 7:45 AM EDT

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Tasmanian devils, the carnivorous marsupials whose feisty, frenzied eating habits won the animals cartoon fame, have returned to mainland Australia for the first time in some 3,000 years. “Seeing those devils released into a wild landscape — it’s a really...