Latest Discrimination News

Protesters march, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. Authorities pleaded for calm while activists vowed to fight on Thursday in Kentucky's largest city, where a gunman wounded two police officers during anguished protests following the decision not to charge officers for killing Breonna Taylor. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

In despair, protesters take to streets for Breonna Taylor

Sep. 25, 2020 2:06 AM EDT

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Some of them raised their fists and called out “Black lives matter!” Others tended to the letters, flowers and signs grouped together in a square in downtown Louisville. All of them said her name: Breonna Taylor. People dismayed that the officers who shot the Black...

Protesters march, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. Authorities pleaded for calm while activists vowed to fight on Thursday in Kentucky's largest city, where a gunman wounded two police officers during anguished protests following the decision not to charge officers for killing Breonna Taylor. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

In despair, protesters take to streets for Breonna Taylor

Sep. 25, 2020 1:08 AM EDT

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Some of them raised their fists and called out “Black lives matter!” Others tended to the letters, flowers and signs grouped together in a square in downtown Louisville. All of them said her name: Breonna Taylor. People dismayed that the officers who shot the Black...

Two men gather outside of Jefferson Square Park following protests over a lack of charges against Louisville police in Breonna Taylor's death, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, in Louisville, Ky.  (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

The Latest: Louisville protest ends after a night of tension

Sep. 24, 2020 11:46 PM EDT

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The Latest on a grand jury's decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor's death: (all times EDT) 11:15 p.m. A protest has ended outside a Louisville church where demonstrators had rallied against a grand jury decision in the Breonna...

Protesters march, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. Authorities pleaded for calm while activists vowed to fight on Thursday in Kentucky's largest city, where a gunman wounded two police officers during anguished protests following the decision not to charge officers for killing Breonna Taylor. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

'No easy answer': Many ask what next in Breonna Taylor case

Sep. 24, 2020 11:16 PM EDT

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — In the wake of the decision not to prosecute Kentucky police officers for killing Breonna Taylor, authorities and activists alike wrestled Thursday with the question of what comes next amid continued demands for justice in the Black woman's death. “The question obviously is:...

This undated image taken from video provided by attorney Susan Otto shows Christopher Vialva in the federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Ind. Otto, the lawyer for Vialva, the first Black inmate set to die in a series of federal executions this year says race played a central role in landing him on death row for slaying a white couple from Iowa. Otto says just one juror was Black and 11 white at Vialva's 2000 federal trial in western Texas. Vialva's execution is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. (Photo courtesy of Susan Otto via AP)

Feds put first Black inmate to death since execution restart

Sep. 24, 2020 10:52 PM EDT

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — A man who killed a religious couple visiting Texas from Iowa was executed Thursday, the first Black inmate put to death as part of the Trump administration’s resumption of federal executions after a nearly 20-year pause. Christopher Vialva, 40, was pronounced dead shortly...

Kentucky U.S. Senate candidate Democrat Amy McGrath, speaks to a man in Jefferson Square, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. McGrath called for fundamental change to combat

Kentucky Senate candidates take up Breonna Taylor case

Sep. 24, 2020 6:44 PM EDT

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Democrat Amy McGrath called for fundamental change to combat “systemic racism" as the Senate candidate met Thursday with some of the Kentucky protesters seething over a grand jury's decision not to charge officers in the killing of Breonna Taylor. Senate Majority Leader Mitch...

Maryland man sentenced for shooting deemed a hate crime

Sep. 24, 2020 6:11 PM EDT

BALTIMORE (AP) — A Maryland man has been sentenced to 25 years in prison after a jury found him guilty of a hate crime and others charges in the shooting of a Black man, authorities said. Brandon Troy Higgs, 25, of Reisterstown, was arrested in December 2018 after shooting Elvis Smith in the leg while...

Protesters react to gunfire, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. A police officer was shot in the evening. A grand jury has indicted one officer on criminal charges six months after Breonna Taylor was fatally shot by police in Kentucky. The jury presented its decision against fired officer Brett Hankison Wednesday to a judge in Louisville, where the shooting took place. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

AP-NORC poll: Support for racial injustice protests declines

Sep. 24, 2020 4:10 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — As the decision in Kentucky to bring charges against only one of three police officers involved in the raid that killed Breonna Taylor sparks renewed protests nationwide, a new survey finds support has fallen for demonstrations against systemic racism. The poll from The Associated...

The flag-draped casket of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, carried by Supreme Court police officers, arrives in the Great Hall at the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. Ginsburg, 87, died of cancer on Sept. 18. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)

Ginsburg's empathy born of Jewish history and discrimination

Sep. 24, 2020 8:32 AM EDT

In the Jewish tradition, burials usually take place within 24 hours of death. But Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Sept. 18, was lying in state nearly a week later Thursday at the Supreme Court where she served as justice for 27 years, and Friday at the U.S. Capitol. “Even though it generally goes against...

In this Sept. 23, 1970, photo provided the Houston Library, tennis players hold up $1 bills after signing a contract with World Tennis magazine publisher Gladys Heldman to turn pro and start the Virginia Slims tennis circuit. From left standing are: Valerie Ziegenfuss, Billie Jean King, Nancy Richey and Peaches Bartkowicz. From left seated are: Judy Tegart Dalton, Kerry Melville Reid, Rosie Casals, Gladys Heldman and Kristy Pigeon. Gladys Heldman replaced her daughter, Julie Heldman, who was injured and unable to pose for the 1970 photo.  It’s the 50th anniversary of Billie Jean King and eight other women breaking away from the tennis establishment in 1970 and signing a $1 contract to form the Virginia Slims circuit. That led to the WTA Tour, which offers millions in prize money. (Bela Ugrin/Courtesy Houston Library via AP)

Original 9 trailblazers stood for tennis equality in 1970

Sep. 23, 2020 8:36 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — Billie Jean King and eight other women of the “Original 9” are celebrating the 50th anniversary of signing $1 contracts and breaking away from the U.S. tennis establishment to form the Virginia Slims circuit in 1970. It helped launch the WTA Tour, which now offers millions in...