Latest Education costs News

FILE - In this Sunday, April 12, 2020 file photo, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, right, delivers his homily over mostly empty pews as he leads an Easter Mass at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York. Due to coronavirus concerns, no congregants were allowed to attend the Mass which was broadcast live on local TV. The Archdiocese of New York received 15 loans worth at least $28 million just for its top executive offices. St. Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth Avenue was approved for at least $1 million. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

AP: Catholic Church lobbied for taxpayer funds, got $1.4B

Jul. 10, 2020 1:04 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. Roman Catholic Church used a special and unprecedented exemption from federal rules to amass at least $1.4 billion in taxpayer-backed coronavirus aid, with many millions going to dioceses that have paid huge settlements or sought bankruptcy protection because of clergy sexual abuse...

The UConn women's rowing team works out on Wangumbaug Lake in this September 2019 photo taken in Coventry Lake, Conn. The school's decision to cut the program is designed to help cut by $10 million the school's $43 million athletic department deficit as it deals with falling revenue during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Jen Sanford via AP)

UConn rowing team considers Title IX response to elimination

Jul. 9, 2020 10:36 AM EDT

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — UConn women's rowing coach Jen Sanford said she isn't looking for a villain to blame for the school's cost-cutting decision to eliminate her program. She just wants to find a way to save the athletic opportunities her program provides for about 60 women each year. That is why she is...

FILE - In this June 10, 2020 file photo, Jovita Carranza, Administrator of the Small Business Administration, testifies during a Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship hearing to examine implementation of Title I of the CARES Act, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Treasury Department said it is releasing on Monday, July 6 the names of more than 700,000 companies that received funds from the government’s small business lending program, a massive effort intended to support the economy as states shut down in April to contain the viral outbreak.  (Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP, File)

The Latest: Financial firms among big relief fund recipients

Jul. 6, 2020 5:59 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the Treasury decision to identify hundreds of thousands of businesses that received funding through the Paycheck Protection Program, created to preserve jobs at smaller businesses during the coronavirus pandemic: ___ The financial services industry received roughly $27 billion...

In this undated photo provided by Southern Utah Athletics, Ghita Nassik hits the ball during tennis practice at Southern Utah University in Cedar City, Utah. Southern Utah announced June 23, 2020, it was eliminating its men’s and women’s tennis programs effective immediately due to budget cuts brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. (Joey DeGraaf/Southern Utah Athletics  via AP)

As schools ponder cutting sports, tennis proves vulnerable

Jul. 6, 2020 4:12 PM EDT

The promise of college tennis lured Abhimanyu Vannemreddy from his home in India to the United States, where he settled in at Winthrop in South Carolina. Now he’s pondering his future thousands of miles away from his family as financial reality crashes down on his sport. Winthrop announced last month that...

FILE - In this June 27, 2020, file photo, Saltillo High School seniors make their way to the football field as the sun begins to set for their graduation ceremony in Saltillo, Miss. The number of high school seniors applying for U.S. federal college aid plunged in the weeks following the sudden closure of school buildings this spring — a time when students were cut off from school counselors, and families hit with financial setbacks were reconsidering plans for higher education. (Thomas Wells/The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal via AP, File)

Amid pandemic, fewer students seek federal aid for college

Jul. 6, 2020 12:26 AM EDT

The number of high school seniors applying for U.S. federal college aid plunged in the weeks following the sudden closure of school buildings this spring — a time when students were cut off from school counselors, and families hit with financial setbacks were reconsidering plans for higher education. In...

FILE - In this May 20, 2020 file photo a runner passes through an arch on the campus of Boston University, in Boston. COVID-19 has disrupted the plans of an estimated 3 million returning college students. Due to the pandemic’s financial and psychological stressors, some students are debating whether they should sit out this fall. While taking time out from school during the pandemic might seem like a safe choice, it could have lasting consequences.  (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

Why Missing College This Fall Is a Bad Idea

Jul. 2, 2020 8:16 AM EDT

As colleges figure out how to structure classes this fall, many students are questioning whether to enroll at all. The idea of taking a gap year might sound enticing, but returning students should think twice. Many colleges have official gap year or deferred enrollment policies for incoming freshmen. But...

Editorial Roundup: US

Jul. 1, 2020 3:10 PM EDT

Excerpts from recent editorials in the United States and abroad: ___ June 30 The Wall Street Journal on allegations that Russia offered bounties for killing American troops in Afghanistan: It is going to be something to behold, on Jan. 21, 2021, when President Biden takes revenge on Russia for paying the Taliban...

6 Do’s and Don’ts When Saving Money During a Crisis

Jul. 1, 2020 12:07 PM EDT

Probably the last thing you want to think about during a crisis is working on healthy financial habits like saving money. But if you’re able to save, you can make your eventual recovery easier. “Every time you put some (money) away, you’re looking out for your future self,” says...

In a August 28, 2018 photo, Bangor Christian Schools sophomore Olivia Carson, 15, of Glenburn was dropped off on the first day of school by her mother, Amy Carson in Bangor. The Carsons are one of three Maine families that are challenging the prohibition on using public money to pay tuition at religious schools after a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision. States can’t cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education, a divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, June 30, 2020. Two states with existing private education programs, Maine and Vermont, could see quick efforts to force them to allow religious schools to participate. (Gabor Degre/The Bangor Daily News via AP)

Maine, Vermont next in fight over aid to religious schools

Jul. 1, 2020 11:45 AM EDT

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A U.S. Supreme Court decision that says states can’t cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education could breathe new life into efforts to force Maine and Vermont to help fund religious educations. A lawsuit by three families in Maine who...

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen Tuesday, June 30, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

High court sparks new battle over church-state separation

Jul. 1, 2020 9:15 AM EDT

The Supreme Court elated religious freedom advocates and alarmed secular groups with its Tuesday ruling on public funding for religious education, a decision whose long-term effect on the separation of church and state remains to be seen. In Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, the high court ruled 5-4 that...