Latest Higher education News

UK historian quits Cambridge post after slavery remarks

Jul. 3, 2020 10:31 AM EDT

LONDON (AP) — British historian and TV presenter David Starkey relinquished his honorary fellowship at a University of Cambridge college Friday after he drew outrage for his comments about Black people and whether slavery should be considered genocide. Starkey said in an interview for a YouTube show...

Disney suspends college internship program amid pandemic

Jul. 3, 2020 9:12 AM EDT

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Walt Disney World has suspended the Disney College Program indefinitely amid the continuing coronavirus pandemic. Disney said in a blog post on Thursday that the internship's participants won't be among those returning to work when it reopens its Florida theme parks later this month....

Officials: Students in Alabama threw COVID contest parties

Jul. 2, 2020 7:12 PM EDT

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — Several college students in an Alabama city organized “COVID-19” parties as a contest to see who would get the virus first, an official said. Students hosted the parties to intentionally infect each other with the new coronavirus, news outlets quoted Tuscaloosa City...

Boise State cutting baseball, women's swimming and diving

Jul. 2, 2020 4:57 PM EDT

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Boise State is discontinuing its baseball program just months after the school was forced to cut short its first season in 40 years with only a handful of games played. The school has also cut women's swimming and diving because of budget issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic. On a...

FILE - In this May 20, 2020 file photo a runner passes through an arch on the campus of Boston University, in Boston. COVID-19 has disrupted the plans of an estimated 3 million returning college students. Due to the pandemic’s financial and psychological stressors, some students are debating whether they should sit out this fall. While taking time out from school during the pandemic might seem like a safe choice, it could have lasting consequences.  (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

Why Missing College This Fall Is a Bad Idea

Jul. 2, 2020 8:16 AM EDT

As colleges figure out how to structure classes this fall, many students are questioning whether to enroll at all. The idea of taking a gap year might sound enticing, but returning students should think twice. Many colleges have official gap year or deferred enrollment policies for incoming freshmen. But...

Health officials disinfect an area around a hospital after one of the hospital's patients tested positive for the new coronavirus in Gwangju, South Korea, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. South Korea is considering including religious facilities on the same list with nightclubs, hostess bars and karaoke rooms as

The Latest: South Korea worries as virus resurgence spreads

Jul. 1, 2020 10:41 PM EDT

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea says it has confirmed 54 more COVID-19 cases as the coronavirus continues to spread beyond the capital region and reach cities like Gwangju, which has shut schools and tightened social restrictions after dozens fell sick this week. The figures reported Thursday brought the...

University of Mississippi Vice Chancellor for Intercollegiate Athletics Keith Carter, left, talks with Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey, right, before they testify at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. The hearing is looking at the National Collegiate Athletic Association Board of Governors' recent report on student-athlete compensation and the modernization of rules related to name, image, and likeness (NIL) commercialization. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

SEC's Sankey: Federal NIL law needed for fair competition

Jul. 1, 2020 4:45 PM EDT

Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey told a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday there needs to be a uniform federal law to regulate the compensation of college athletes instead of a series of state versions with differing requirements. Sankey was part of a panel discussing the potential impact of...

Greater Zion Stadium at Dixie State University is shown Tuesday, June 30, 2020, in St. George, Utah. Dixie State University is considering dropping Dixie from its name as another example of the nation’s reexamination of symbols associated with the Confederacy. (Chris Caldwell/The Spectrum via AP)

Utah university to consider dropping 'Dixie' from its name

Jul. 1, 2020 4:20 PM EDT

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — After years of resisting calls to change, a university in Utah is considering dropping “Dixie” from its name in another example of the nation’s reexamination of the Confederacy and slavery. Dixie State University, located about 300 miles (480 kilometers) south of...

FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2019, file photo, Kansas State head coach Chris Klieman warms up his team before an NCAA college football game against West Virginia in Manhattan, Kan. Kansas State football players say they will boycott all team activities until administrators create a policy that would allow a student to be expelled for “openly racist, threatening or disrespectful actions.” The move that most players announced Saturday on social media follows a tweet by a student about the death of George Floyd that prompted outrage on campus. Late Sunday, June 28, 2020, coach Chris Klieman tweeted his support: “Racism is NOT welcome at KSTATE  now or in the future. ... I am excited to help every player unite for the solution NOW, so that that we can come together stronger than ever. Black Lives Matter.” (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner, File)

K-State launches diversity programs after football boycott

Jul. 1, 2020 12:18 PM EDT

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas State is launching a diversity and education fund amid several other initiatives to address racial injustice after football players threatened a boycott in response to an insensitive tweet by a student about the death of George Floyd. The fund will allow boosters to funnel...

In a August 28, 2018 photo, Bangor Christian Schools sophomore Olivia Carson, 15, of Glenburn was dropped off on the first day of school by her mother, Amy Carson in Bangor. The Carsons are one of three Maine families that are challenging the prohibition on using public money to pay tuition at religious schools after a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision. States can’t cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education, a divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, June 30, 2020. Two states with existing private education programs, Maine and Vermont, could see quick efforts to force them to allow religious schools to participate. (Gabor Degre/The Bangor Daily News via AP)

Maine, Vermont next in fight over aid to religious schools

Jul. 1, 2020 11:45 AM EDT

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A U.S. Supreme Court decision that says states can’t cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education could breathe new life into efforts to force Maine and Vermont to help fund religious educations. A lawsuit by three families in Maine who...