Latest Native Americans News

Men in a vintage US WWII uniforms stand behind flowers left at Les Braves monument after a D-Day 76th anniversary ceremony in Saint Laurent sur Mer, Normandy, France, Saturday, June 6, 2020. Due to coronavirus measures many ceremonies and memorials have been cancelled in the region with the exception of very small gatherings. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

The Latest: Arizona university to start, end fall term early

Jun. 6, 2020 8:22 PM EDT

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Northern Arizona University will start and end its fall semester earlier this year, hoping to mitigate the spread ofthe coronavirus. University President Rita Cheng has announced in an email that classes will start Aug. 12 and end before Thanksgiving Day. She adds that the university...

Judge sides with tribe in lawsuit over reservation status

Jun. 6, 2020 6:11 PM EDT

A judge has stopped the federal government from rescinding its reservation designation for a Native American tribe's land in Massachusetts, ordering the Interior Department to review the matter and issue new findings. U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman in Washington, D.C., granted a summary judgment on behalf of...

FILE - In this July 21, 2015, file photo, Carolyn Yazzie fills in her ballot at the Shiprock Chapter House in Shiprock, N.M., during the Navajo Nation's referendum election. Native American voting rights advocates are cautioning against states moving to mail-in ballots without opportunities for tribal members to vote safely in person. The Native American Rights Fund released a wide-ranging report on voting rights Thursday, June 4, 2020. In it, the group outlined the challenges that could arise as states move to rely more heavily on mail-in ballots. (Jon Austria/The Daily Times via AP, File)

Report highlights voting inequities in tribal communities

Jun. 4, 2020 1:04 AM EDT

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Native American voting rights advocates are cautioning against states moving to mail-in ballots without opportunities for tribal members to vote safely in person. In a wide-ranging report released Thursday, the Native American Rights Fund outlined the challenges that could arise:...

Democratic congressional candidate Teresa Leger Fernandez, in the blue mask, cheers on supporters at a polling station Tuesday, June 2, 2020, in Santa Fe, N.M. Fernandez was flanked by her three sons, left to right, Alisandro, Dario and Abelino. The sign she holds,

New Mexico close to historic all-female US House delegation

Jun. 3, 2020 1:01 PM EDT

RIO RANCHO, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico has moved closer to possibly sending a historic delegation of all women of color to the U.S. House. According to unofficial results from Tuesday's primary, Democrat Teresa Leger Fernandez, a Latina, won a seven-way race to capture her party’s nomination for the...

Democratic congressional candidate Teresa Leger Fernandez, in the blue mask, cheers on supporters at a polling station on Tuesday, June 2, 2020, in Santa Fe, N.M. Behind her are her three sons, from left, Dario, Abelino and Alisandro. The sign she holds,

Fernandez defeats Valerie Plame in New Mexico House primary

Jun. 3, 2020 1:12 AM EDT

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Attorney Teresa Leger Fernandez defeated former CIA operative Valerie Plame to win the Democratic nomination in New Mexico’s 3rd Congressional District in Tuesday’s primary. Leger Fernandez overcame six competitors including Plame to win her party’s nomination to...

In this June 14, 2019 photo, a four-wheeler is ridden through Arctic Village, Alaska. If the pandemic has deepened the sense of isolation for the 8,000 or so Gwich’in, sprinkled across northeastern Alaska into Canada, it has also emphasized the importance of the tribe’s traditions and its profound spiritual connection to the homelands that sustain the caribou and other wildlife on which they depend. (Brian Adams/Religion News Service via AP)

Shunning virus and Big Oil, Alaska tribe revives traditions

Jun. 2, 2020 4:15 PM EDT

ARCTIC VILLAGE, Alaska (RNS) — Arriving home on one of the last regular flights before pandemic restrictions went into effect in mid-February, Sarah James got to her house to find two caribous worth of meat in her freezer. Since flights have become intermittent to this indigenous village 100 miles north of...

FILE - In this May 25, 2018, file photo, Jose Espinoza, 18, stands outside his trailer with his 4-month-old infant, Emmily, and wife, Maria Rodriguez, 19, in Vado, N.M. while speaking about making only $50 a day picking onions. New Mexico's child poverty rate rose slightly and continues to rank near the bottom nationally despite improvements in the state's economy, a child-advocacy group said Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. The 2019 New Mexico Kids Count Data Book, released by New Mexico Voices for Children, found 26% of the state's children in 2018 remained at or below the federal poverty line. That places the state back to 49th nationally in child poverty. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)

Report: Child disparities highest in US South, West

Jun. 2, 2020 1:05 PM EDT

RIO RANCHO, N.M. (AP) — Childhood disparities around malnutrition, graduation rates, and early deaths are worst among rural, black-majority counties in the American South and isolated counties with Native American populations, according to a new report. Those inequities put these populations more at risk...

A man walks on Lake Street while looking at businesses destroyed during riots and protests over the death of George Floyd,  Sunday May 31, 2020, in Minneapolis. Floyd died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Unrest devastates a city's landmark street of diversity

May. 31, 2020 8:08 PM EDT

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Along the miles-long Minneapolis street where more than a century of migrants have found their American footholds -- Germans, Swedes, Vietnamese, Somalis, Mexicans -- a new history can be traced. There’s the smoldering police station torched early Thursday morning by protesters...

FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2014, file photo, students play basketball at Little Singer Community School in Birdsprings, Ariz., on the Navajo Nation. Basketball is woven in the fabric of Native American life. Now, during a global pandemic, the balls have all but stopped bouncing. Already hit hard by the coronavirus outbreak, Native Americans are faced with life without basketball — or any other sport - for the forseeable future. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

As Native Americans fight virus, basketball takes a timeout

May. 23, 2020 12:12 PM EDT

PHOENIX (AP) — Basketball is woven into the fabric of Native American life. Kids dribble balls on dirt courts and shoot at makeshift rims on some reservations while tournaments are held in state-of-the art buildings on others. Players and fans may travel hundreds of miles to play and watch games of...

This photo from early May, 2020, provided by Angeline Cheek shows Curtis Yazzie as he demonstrates at a construction site for the XL Pipeline just inside the U.S.-Canadian border near Saco, Mont. Members of several tribes in Montana and North Dakota traveled to the border crossing for a small protest against the pipeline earlier this month, according to Cheek, an activist from Montana's Fort Peck Tribe and organizer for the ACLU of Montana. Calgary-based TC Energy has built the first piece of the disputed Keystone XL oil sands pipeline across the U.S. border and started work on labor camps in Montana and South Dakota. (Angeline Cheek via AP)

First piece of disputed Keystone XL pipeline finished

May. 21, 2020 9:37 PM EDT

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A Canadian company has built the first piece of the disputed Keystone XL oil sands pipeline across the U.S. border and started work on labor camps in Montana and South Dakota. But it has not resolved a courtroom setback that would make it hard to finish the $8 billion project. The...