Latest Slavery News

FILE - In this March 12, 2020, file photo, George Washington High School stands in San Francisco. The San Francisco school board has voted to remove the names of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln from public schools after officials deemed them and other prominent figures, including Sen. Dianne Feinstein unworthy of the honor. After months of controversy, the board voted 6-1 Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021, in favor of renaming 44 San Francisco school sites with new names with no connection to slavery, oppression, racism or similar criteria, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

San Francisco to strip Washington, Lincoln from school names

Jan. 27, 2021 8:56 PM EST

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The names of Abraham Lincoln, George Washington and other prominent figures including California Sen. Dianne Feinstein will be removed from 44 San Francisco public schools, a move that stirred debate Wednesday on whether the famously liberal city has taken the national reckoning on...

This cover image released by St. Martin's Press shows

Review: A military writer topples the Robert E. Lee statue

Jan. 26, 2021 1:07 PM EST

“Robert E. Lee and Me: A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause,” by Ty Seidule (St. Martin’s Press) Few authors can say they have lived their story with quite the same authority as Ty Seidule, retired U.S. Army brigadier general and professor emeritus of history at the...

FILE - In this June 7, 2020 file photo, Dwight McKissic, pastor of Cornerstone Baptist Church, and his wife, Vera McKissic, pray during services in Arlington, Texas. As a student in college and seminary, then as a pastor in Texas, McKissic has been affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention for more than 45 years. Now he’s pondering whether he and his congregation should break away -- following the steps of several other Black pastors who exited in dismay over race-related actions of some white SBC leaders.  (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Some Black Southern Baptists feel shut out by white leaders

Jan. 24, 2021 4:22 PM EST

As a student in college and seminary, then as a pastor in Texas, Dwight McKissic has been affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention for more than 45 years. Now he’s pondering whether he and his congregation should break away. “It would feel like a divorce,” McKissic said....

Workers begin to remove a display of flags on the National Mall one day after the inauguration of President Joe Biden, Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Biden revokes Trump report promoting 'patriotic education'

Jan. 21, 2021 11:54 AM EST

President Joe Biden revoked a recent Trump administration report that aimed to promote “patriotic education” in schools but that historians mocked and rejected as political propaganda. In an executive order signed on Wednesday in his first day in office, Biden disbanded Donald Trump’s...

FILE - In this file photo taken Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, a protester from the Uighur community living in Turkey, holds an anti-China placard during a protest in Istanbul, , against what they allege is oppression by the Chinese government to Muslim Uighurs in far-western Xinjiang province. The accusation of genocide by U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo against China touches on a hot-button human rights issue between China and the West. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel, File)

China labels Pompeo 'doomsday clown' over genocide claims

Jan. 20, 2021 7:08 AM EST

BEIJING (AP) — China’s Foreign Ministry described outgoing U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Wednesday as a “doomsday clown” and said his designation of China as a perpetrator of genocide and crimes against humanity was merely “a piece of wastepaper.” The...

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)

Pompeo says China's policies on Muslims amount to 'genocide'

Jan. 19, 2021 2:16 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — On his way out the door, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo lashed out anew at China on Tuesday by declaring that its policies on Muslims and ethnic minorities in the western Xinjiang region constitute “crimes against humanity” and a “genocide.” The rarely used...

FILE - This images shows a depiction of Abraham Lincoln taking the oath of office as the 16th president of the United States administered by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, on March 4, 1861. Historians cite the first inaugural speeches of Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln as possible parallels for Joe Biden, who has said his goal is to “restore the soul” of the country even as millions baselessly insist incumbent Donald Trump was the winner. (AP Photo, File)

Unity has long been a theme, and anxiety, for new presidents

Jan. 15, 2021 11:47 AM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — When Joe Biden addresses the country for the first time as president, his inaugural speech is likely to echo calls for unity that predecessors have invoked since the first time George Washington was sworn in. Unity has since been a theme, and an anxiety, for many incoming presidents, who...

Lawsuit: Community college program was human trafficking

Jan. 14, 2021 1:22 PM EST

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Eleven students from Brazil and Chile have filed a federal lawsuit accusing a northwest Iowa community college, a recruitment company, a pet food manufacturer and a packaging company of human trafficking and involuntary servitude. The lawsuit filed Monday in the Northern District of...

A man walks past a poster with the slogans

China demands US lift Xinjiang cotton, tomato import ban

Jan. 14, 2021 5:19 AM EST

BEIJING (AP) — China on Thursday demanded Washington drop a ban on cotton and tomato imports from its Muslim northwest over complaints they are produced by forced labor, which a spokesman dismissed as the “lie of the century.” The ban announced Wednesday adds to a flurry of sanctions imposed...

An elderly Chinese man looks at map of Chinese showing its different ethnic groups and the slogan

US to block cotton from China region targeted in crackdown

Jan. 13, 2021 9:02 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government announced Wednesday that it will halt imports of cotton and tomatoes from the Uighur region of China in its most sweeping action yet to pressure the Communist Party over its campaign against ethnic minorities. Officials said Customs and Border Protection will use its...