Latest Student financial aid News

FILE - In this June 10, 2020 file photo, Jovita Carranza, Administrator of the Small Business Administration, testifies during a Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship hearing to examine implementation of Title I of the CARES Act, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Treasury Department said it is releasing on Monday, July 6 the names of more than 700,000 companies that received funds from the government’s small business lending program, a massive effort intended to support the economy as states shut down in April to contain the viral outbreak.  (Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP, File)

The Latest: Financial firms among big relief fund recipients

Jul. 6, 2020 5:59 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the Treasury decision to identify hundreds of thousands of businesses that received funding through the Paycheck Protection Program, created to preserve jobs at smaller businesses during the coronavirus pandemic: ___ The financial services industry received roughly $27 billion...

FILE - In this June 27, 2020, file photo, Saltillo High School seniors make their way to the football field as the sun begins to set for their graduation ceremony in Saltillo, Miss. The number of high school seniors applying for U.S. federal college aid plunged in the weeks following the sudden closure of school buildings this spring — a time when students were cut off from school counselors, and families hit with financial setbacks were reconsidering plans for higher education. (Thomas Wells/The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal via AP, File)

Amid pandemic, fewer students seek federal aid for college

Jul. 6, 2020 12:26 AM EDT

The number of high school seniors applying for U.S. federal college aid plunged in the weeks following the sudden closure of school buildings this spring — a time when students were cut off from school counselors, and families hit with financial setbacks were reconsidering plans for higher education. In...

FILE - In this May 20, 2020 file photo a runner passes through an arch on the campus of Boston University, in Boston. COVID-19 has disrupted the plans of an estimated 3 million returning college students. Due to the pandemic’s financial and psychological stressors, some students are debating whether they should sit out this fall. While taking time out from school during the pandemic might seem like a safe choice, it could have lasting consequences.  (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

Why Missing College This Fall Is a Bad Idea

Jul. 2, 2020 8:16 AM EDT

As colleges figure out how to structure classes this fall, many students are questioning whether to enroll at all. The idea of taking a gap year might sound enticing, but returning students should think twice. Many colleges have official gap year or deferred enrollment policies for incoming freshmen. But...

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos participates in a roundtable event at Waukesha STEM Academy Tuesday, June 23, 2020, in Waukesha, Wis. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)

Democrats fail to override Trump veto on student loan policy

Jun. 26, 2020 5:00 PM EDT

House Democrats on Friday failed to override President Donald Trump’s veto of a measure that would have reversed the Education Department's tough policy on loan forgiveness for students misled by for-profit colleges. The House voted 238-173 in support of the override measure, coming up short of the...

How New Grads Can Handle 3 Essential Post-College Questions

Jun. 24, 2020 1:51 PM EDT

Life after graduation is always an unknown. But the coronavirus pandemic has added even more uncertainty for the nearly 4 million students expected to receive college degrees in 2019-20, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. “I feel like when you graduate, you go out into the real...

Don't fall for COVID-19 student loan relief scams

Jun. 17, 2020 2:11 PM EDT

Student loan borrowers were targets for scams before the coronavirus pandemic hit. The longer people struggle, the more desperate they become, and that’s when scammers and fraudsters thrive. “They’re using the same playbook, but more aggressively,” says Seth Frotman, executive...

President Donald Trump listens to a question from a reporter during a roundtable with industry executives about reopening country after the coronavirus closures, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Friday, May 29, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump vetoes bipartisan measure against DeVos' loan rules

May. 29, 2020 7:57 PM EDT

President Donald Trump on Friday vetoed a measure that would have overturned a policy that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos issued in 2019 making it harder for students to get their loans erased after being misled by for-profit colleges. The Senate gave final approval to the bipartisan measure in March, dealing a...

FILE - In this March 14, 2019, file photo students walk on the Stanford University campus in Stanford, Calif.  (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

A student loan expert takes her own advice

May. 14, 2020 8:19 AM EDT

When you spend your days dispensing advice about student loans, you learn a thing or two about navigating the system. In the 10 years it took me to repay $40,000 in federal student loans and interest, I never found any secret tricks. But I did find ways to make the system work. At times I made no payments, and I...

FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2020, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos pauses as she testifies during a hearing of a House Appropriations Sub-Committee on the fiscal year 2021 budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration is barring most international students and all students who entered the U.S. illegally from receiving emergency college grants approved by Congress as part of a $2.2 trillion coronavirus rescue package. DeVos issued the restriction in new guidelines released Tuesday, April 21, 2020, telling colleges how to distribute more than $6 billion in grants meant to help students cover unexpected costs triggered by the pandemic. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Education Department targets employers over wage garnishment

May. 12, 2020 11:27 AM EDT

The U.S. Education Department says it's ramping up efforts to contact more than 37,000 employers who have improperly continued to garnish wages from workers who have fallen behind on their student loans. Congress ordered a temporary pause on involuntary collections in March, but the Education Department was sued...

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room, Friday, March 27, 2020, in Washington, as Vice President Mike Pence listens. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

54,000 still getting pay held over student debt, filing says

May. 11, 2020 6:44 PM EDT

A Monday court filing from the U.S. Education Department says the agency was still garnishing wages from more than 50,000 workers who had fallen behind on their student loans more than a month after Congress ordered an immediate suspension of the practice during the coronavirus pandemic. The finding, which...