Latest Cancer News

Ted Foxworthy, right, hugs his son Jacob Foxworthy as they walked off the track where he received his Speedway High School diploma during a ceremony at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Saturday, May 30, 2020. The ceremony was held at the track to allow for social distancing requirements due to the COVID-19 pandemic. When Ted Foxworthy was diagnosed with cancer, he set two goals: Celebrating his youngest child's 18th birthday and seeing him graduate. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

For father battling cancer, a graduation to victory lane

May. 30, 2020 7:36 PM EDT

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Jacob Foxworthy and his parents waited patiently as their car crawled through pit road at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on this most unusual of graduation days. When his turn came, the Speedway High School senior climbed out and walked across the race track's iconic yard of bricks, his...

Pro Football Hall of Famer Floyd Little fighting cancer

May. 30, 2020 3:52 PM EDT

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Pro Football Hall of Famer Floyd Little, who starred in the NFL for the Denver Broncos, has been diagnosed with cancer, according to a former Syracuse Orange teammate who has set up a GoFundMe page to help pay for treatment costs. Pat Killorin, a center for Syracuse in the mid-1960s,...

This microscope image made available by the National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research in 2015 shows human colon cancer cells with the nuclei stained red. On Friday, May 29, 2020, doctors are reporting success with newer drugs that control certain types of cancer better, reduce the risk it will come back and make treatment simpler and easier to bear. (NCI Center for Cancer Research via AP)

New drugs make headway against lung, prostate, colon cancers

May. 29, 2020 8:33 AM EDT

Doctors are reporting success with newer drugs that control certain types of cancer better, reduce the risk it will come back and make treatment simpler and easier to bear. Gentler drugs would be a relief to patients like Jenn Carroll, a 57-year-old human resources director from New Hartford, Connecticut, who...

This electron microscope image made available and color-enhanced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Integrated Research Facility in Fort Detrick, Md., shows Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, orange, isolated from a patient. Research released on Thursday, May 28, 2020 shows how dangerous the coronavirus is for current and former cancer patients. Those who developed COVID-19 were much more likely to die within a month than people without cancer who got it, two studies found. (NIAID/National Institutes of Health via AP)

Cancer, coronavirus are a dangerous mix, new studies find

May. 28, 2020 5:00 PM EDT

New research shows how dangerous the coronavirus is for current and former cancer patients. Those who developed COVID-19 were much more likely to die within a month than people without cancer who got it, two studies found. They are the largest reports on people with both diseases in the United States, the United...

FILE - In this Nov. 3, 2019, file photo, runners take part in the New York City Marathon in New York. Non-profit organizations across the country are scrambling to keep their causes front of mind in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic. Social distancing measures brought on by the coronavirus have forced non-profits that use participatory events like charity walks and runs as fundraisers are getting creative. (AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez, File)

Running on empty? Charity events wary in time of COVID-19

May. 25, 2020 2:03 PM EDT

It wasn't exactly the finish line Ali Riecke had in mind. The 27-year-old had envisioned something more tropical when she signed up to participate in her second “Run Across Haiti,” an ambitious eight-day, 200-mile tour of the impoverished Caribbean nation sponsored by the nonprofit organization...

Virus rules push bell ringing chemotherapy ceremony outside

May. 23, 2020 8:10 AM EDT

GREELEY, Colo. (AP) — As the spring sun warmed the courtyard outside Banner North Colorado Medical Center’s cancer unit, Casey Pearson was simply relieved. Pearson, who was celebrating his final chemotherapy treatment with the traditional ringing of the bell ceremony Monday, had been surprised...

FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2017 file photo, Roger Daltrey of The Who performs at the 2017 Outside Lands Music Festival at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Daltrey is concerned that the coronavirus pandemic will have a devastating effect on teens with cancer. The Who frontman, along with bandmate Pete Townsend, started the Teen Cancer America foundation in 2012 to deal with the specific needs of teenage cancer patients. But funding depends on live performances, and with venues closed and touring postponed, the organization could be in trouble.(Photo by Amy Harris/Invision/AP, File)

The Who's Roger Daltrey concerned about teens with cancer

May. 21, 2020 5:58 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — Roger Daltrey worries that the coronavirus pandemic will have a devastating effect on a special group of people in need — teens with cancer The Who frontman, along with bandmate Pete Townsend, started the Teen Cancer America foundation in 2012 to deal with the specific needs of...

FILE - In this April 15, 2011, file photo, a bottle of Johnson's baby powder is displayed. Johnson & Johnson is ending production of its iconic talc-based Johnson’s Baby Powder, which has been embroiled in thousands of lawsuits claiming it caused cancer. The world’s biggest maker of health care products said Tuesday, May 19, 2020 that the discontinuation only affects the U.S. and Canada, where demand has been declining. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

J&J to stop selling talc-based baby powder in US, Canada

May. 19, 2020 8:53 PM EDT

FAIRLESS HILLS, Pa. (AP) — Johnson & Johnson is ending sales of its iconic talc-based Johnson’s Baby Powder in the U.S. and Canada, where demand has dwindled amid thousands of lawsuits claiming it has caused cancer. The world’s biggest maker of health care products said Tuesday the...

Scars on Larry Ballman's face from surgery to remove a lump of squamous cell carcinoma are visible as he sits on the front porch of his Cleveland, Minn., home Thursday, April 30, 2020. The surgery was delayed because of the state's halt on elective medical procedures in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Pat Christman/The Free Press via AP)

Care delays took physical, mental toll on patients

May. 16, 2020 1:02 AM EDT

MANKATO, Minn. (AP) — Larry Ballman anxiously watched the cancer on the right side of his face and neck spread from late March into the first weeks of April. A lump of squamous cell carcinoma went from about half the size of a golf ball to an egg within a week, he said, and his discomfort grew with it....

FILE - In this April 27, 2015 file photo, Cassandra Callender, arrives home with her mother in Windsor Locks, Conn., for the first time since December after a court-ordered chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Callender has died after a five-year battle with the disease, her mother said Thursday, May 14. She was 22. (Stephen Dunn/Hartford Courant via AP)

Cassandra Callender, forced to undergo chemo, dies at 22

May. 14, 2020 2:59 PM EDT

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Cassandra Callender, who was forced by Connecticut courts as a teenager to undergo chemotherapy for cancer, has died after a five-year battle with the disease, her mother said Thursday. She was 22. Callender, of Windsor Locks, died Tuesday at home, where she had been in hospice care...