Latest Student finances News

FILE - In this Friday, June 1, 2018, file photo, graduates are silhouetted against the green landscape as they line up to receive their diplomas at Berkshire Community College's commencement exercises at the Shed at Tanglewood in Lenox, Mass. Some lenders advertise their products as a way to pay for college, but these aren’t technically student loans. For unsuspecting students, that could lead to unnecessarily high costs and a lack of consumer protection. (Gillian Jones/The Berkshire Eagle via AP, File)

‘Shadow’ lenders can leave college students in the dark

Jul. 20, 2020 12:33 AM EDT

A new high school graduate may take out about $37,200 in student loans for college, according to a recent NerdWallet study. And for many of them, that won’t be enough. Thirty-eight percent of students borrow additional money for college via credit cards, home equity loans and other non-student loans,...

Panthers owner establishes Johnson C. Smith scholarships

Jul. 16, 2020 2:53 PM EDT

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Panthers owner David Tepper and his wife Nicole are contributing $250,000 to Johnson C. Smith University students to help them overcome financial hardship caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Scholarship funds will benefit as many as 70 returning students who demonstrate financial need....

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks at a press conference with Vice President Mike Pence in Tiger Stadium, on the LSU campus, in Baton Rouge, La., Tuesday, July 14, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

23 AGs sue DeVos over student loan forgiveness policy

Jul. 15, 2020 5:17 PM EDT

Democratic attorneys general in more than 20 states sued Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Wednesday, seeking to repeal her overhaul of a student loan forgiveness program. Congress voted to strike down her policy, which makes it more difficult to get federal student loans erased, but President Donald Trump...

FILE - This Aug. 11, 2019 file photo shows Visa credit cards in New Orleans. When used responsibly, credit cards are a way to build credit history, but they’re not for everyone. Consumers with little to no credit history, or those who have bad credit, may not qualify for cards with reasonable and affordable terms. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)

Millennial Money: Is it OK to never have a credit card?

Jul. 14, 2020 7:51 AM EDT

Thanks to quick online applications and, in some cases, instant approval, credit cards make it as easy to build your credit history as it is to make purchases. But they can also make it easy to fall into debt if you struggle to pay on time or tend to spend more than you have. As a result, some people regard...

University of Kentucky to cap tuition, fees in fall

Jul. 13, 2020 4:09 AM EDT

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — The University of Kentucky plans to cap tuition and mandatory fees in the fall for all full-time students. The move was announced last week by UK President Eli Capilouto as a way to ensure fairness and consistency for students during the coronavirus pandemic. Officials said it should...

Drop in Virginia jail's expenses creates way to pay tuition

Jul. 12, 2020 10:00 AM EDT

TAZEWELL, Va. (AP) — Closing courts in Tazewell County because of the pandemic has created a way to pay the tuition for county students at Southwest Virginia Community College (SVCC) for the rest of this year. “The regional jail expense decreased by $275,000 due to the COVID-19 shutdown of the court...

More uncertainty for international students at UW-Madison

Jul. 7, 2020 4:44 PM EDT

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — New federal guidelines that would force international students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if classes go entirely online this fall has injected another layer of uncertainty for thousands of students and threatens to add to the...

FILE - In this June 27, 2020, file photo, Saltillo High School seniors make their way to the football field as the sun begins to set for their graduation ceremony in Saltillo, Miss. The number of high school seniors applying for U.S. federal college aid plunged in the weeks following the sudden closure of school buildings this spring — a time when students were cut off from school counselors, and families hit with financial setbacks were reconsidering plans for higher education. (Thomas Wells/The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal via AP, File)

Amid pandemic, fewer students seek federal aid for college

Jul. 6, 2020 12:26 AM EDT

The number of high school seniors applying for U.S. federal college aid plunged in the weeks following the sudden closure of school buildings this spring — a time when students were cut off from school counselors, and families hit with financial setbacks were reconsidering plans for higher education. In...

FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2020 file photo, 21 Savage attends the Tom Ford show during NYFW Fall/Winter in Los Angeles. The rapper will be launching a free online financial literacy education program for youth sheltered at home during the coronavirus pandemic. The Grammy winner announced his new Bank Account At Home nationwide initiative on Wednesday. His efforts will include a partnership with Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms to provide free Wi-Fi and tablets for underserved inner-city students. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

21 Savage launches free online financial program for youth

Jul. 2, 2020 6:54 PM EDT

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Rapper 21 Savage will be launching a free online financial literacy education program for youth sheltered at home during the coronavirus pandemic. The Grammy winner announced his new Bank Account At Home nationwide initiative on Wednesday. His efforts will include a partnership with...

FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2020 file photo, 21 Savage attends the Tom Ford show during NYFW Fall/Winter in Los Angeles. The rapper will be launching a free online financial literacy education program for youth sheltered at home during the coronavirus pandemic. The Grammy winner announced his new Bank Account At Home nationwide initiative on Wednesday. His efforts will include a partnership with Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms to provide free Wi-Fi and tablets for underserved inner-city students. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Correction: People-21 Savage story

Jul. 2, 2020 6:44 PM EDT
LOS ANGELES (AP) — In a story July 1, 2020, about rapper 21 Savage launching a free online financial literacy education program for youth, The Associated Press erroneously described recipients as being undeserved. The youth receiving free WiFi and tablets are underserved.