Latest Biodiversity News

Authorities look for killer of Oregon wolf; reward offered

Oct. 23, 2020 6:37 PM EDT

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Someone shot a wolf in Oregon, leaving its pack without a breeding male, wildlife officials said on Friday as they announced a $6,150 reward for the shooter. “I hope this reward will inspire some citizen to come forward with information leading to the killer,” said Wally...

$25,000 offered for info about dead smalltooth sawfish

Oct. 23, 2020 7:49 AM EDT

EVERGLADES CITY, Fla. (AP) — Wildlife officials and a non-profit group are offering $25,000 for information about six critically endangered smalltooth sawfish found killed in Florida. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Thursday that it would pay up to $20,000 for information...

Revised management plan for Columbia River Gorge approved

Oct. 19, 2020 11:22 AM EDT

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A new management plan that will guide future decisions and address urgent issues like climate change has been approved for the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports the Columbia River Gorge Commission approved a revised Management Plan Tuesday,...

DELETES REFERENCE TO SOLANO COUNTY - California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference at Sierra Orchards walnut farm in Winters, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday to protect nearly a third of California’s land and coastal waters in his latest effort to fight climate change that he has blamed for recent record-breaking wildfires. (Renée C. Byer/The Sacramento Bee via AP, Pool)

California governor calls for protecting 30% of state land

Oct. 7, 2020 10:44 PM EDT

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday to protect nearly a third of California’s land and coastal waters in his latest effort to fight climate change that he has blamed for recent record-breaking wildfires. He directed state agencies to pursue actions that will use...

In this June 2017 photo taken in the ACE Basin region of South Carolina and provided by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, a male black rail offers an insect to a female as part of their courtship behaviors. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared the Eastern black rail a threatened species on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, but stopped short of the stronger protections some environmentalists were seeking for the elusive bird now imperiled by habitat destruction, sea level rise, and the increasing frequency and intensity of storms with climate change.  (Christy Hand/South Carolina Department of Natural Resources via AP)

Elusive eastern black rail threatened by rising sea levels

Oct. 7, 2020 5:05 PM EDT

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared the Eastern black rail a threatened species on Wednesday, but stopped short of the stronger protections some environmentalists were seeking for the elusive bird, now imperiled by habitat destruction, sea level rise, and the increasing frequency and intensity of storms...

FILE - In this Dec. 21, 2012, file photo, Big John the Tasmanian devil growls from the confines of his tree house as he makes his first appearance at the Wild Life Sydney Zoo in Sydney. Tasmanian devils, the carnivorous marsupials whose feisty, frenzied eating habits won the animals cartoon fame, have returned to mainland Australia for the first time in some 3,000 years. Conservation groups have recently released some cancer-free devils in a wildlife refuge on the mainland, and they plan to release more in the coming years. Their hope is that the species will thrive and improve the biodiversity.  (AP Photo/Rob Griffith, File)

Feisty Tasmanian devils roaming Australian mainland again

Oct. 7, 2020 7:45 AM EDT

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Tasmanian devils, the carnivorous marsupials whose feisty, frenzied eating habits won the animals cartoon fame, have returned to mainland Australia for the first time in some 3,000 years. “Seeing those devils released into a wild landscape — it’s a really...

FILE - This March 1, 2010 file photo from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a bi-state sage grouse, rear, as he struts for a female at a lek, or mating ground, near Bridgeport, Calif. Citing the government's repeated reversals and refusals to protect a cousin of the greater sage grouse the last two decades, conservationists are suing again to try to force the federal listing of the bi-state sage grouse along the California-Nevada line. The Western Watersheds Project, WildEarth Guardians and Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in San Francisco last week against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It's the latest move in a legal and regulatory battle that dates to the first petition to list the bird in 2001 under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. (Jeannie Stafford/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)

Suit seeks to force listing of bistate grouse on NV-CA line

Oct. 5, 2020 3:17 PM EDT

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Citing the government’s repeated reversals and refusals to protect a cousin of the greater sage grouse the last two decades, conservationists are suing again to try to force the federal listing of the bi-state sage grouse along the California-Nevada line. The Western Watersheds...

In this Sept. 12, 2020, photo provided by the Center For Biological Diversity, is the scene where thousands of rare desert wildflowers have been dug up at Rhyolite Ridge, about 200 miles southeast of Reno, Nev. Federal officials are investigating the destruction of a significant portion of the remaining population of an extremely rare desert wildflower that's being considered for endangered species protection and could jeopardize plans to build a lithium mine in Nevada, the Associated Press has learned.  (Patrick Donnelly/Center For Biological Diversity via AP)

Lawsuit seeks emergency listing of rare Nevada wildflower

Sep. 30, 2020 5:55 PM EDT

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Environmentalists are suing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to try to force the emergency listing of a rare wildflower as an endangered species after much of its population was destroyed at the site of a proposed lithium mine in Nevada. The federal lawsuit the Center for Biological...

Volunteer Divino Humberto tries to douse the fire along a dirt road off the Trans-Pantanal highway, in the Pantanal wetlands near Pocone, Mato Grosso state, Brazil, Friday, Sept. 11, 2020. Pouring the water had little effect as wind redirected the fire toward a tree, causing it to explode as though it had been soaked with gasoline. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

As Brazil's wetlands burned, government did little to help

Sep. 30, 2020 12:27 PM EDT

PORTO JOFRE, Brazil (AP) — After hours navigating Brazil’s Pantanal wetlands in search of jaguars earlier this month, Daniel Moura beached his boat to survey the fire damage. In every direction, he saw only devastation. No wildlife, and no support from federal authorities. “We used to see...

US proposes protections for rare thistle in New Mexico

Sep. 29, 2020 4:19 PM EDT

SILVER CITY, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list a rare plant that was once found in the the American Southwest and Mexico as a threatened species. The agency outlined its intensions in Tuesday’s Federal Register. Aside from adding the Wright’s marsh thistle...