Latest Espionage News

A demonstrator supporting Julian Assange wears a mask and chains outside Westminster Magistrates Court in London, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. Assange is scheduled to be presented before the court by videolink, for a case management hearing ahead of his full extradition trial which begins on Feb. 24. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Julian Assange extradition case to be drawn out for months

Jan. 23, 2020 9:57 AM EST

LONDON (AP) — The complex extradition case designed to determine whether WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will be sent to the U.S. to face espionage charges will take longer than expected. District Judge Vanessa Baraitser agreed on Thursday to add a three-week session in May in addition to the five-day...

FILE - This Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018 file photo shows a general view of a meeting of the North Atlantic Council at NATO headquarters in Brussels. Sweden's top military commander on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020 says a man who duped the Swedish military for 18 years by using forged credentials did not release any information that could harm the Scandinavian country’s security. The Swedish man, who was not named, also worked at NATO headquarters. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, file)

Sweden: Fake officer didn't spy at NATO or hurt security

Jan. 23, 2020 8:42 AM EST

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A man who duped the Swedish military for 18 years by using forged credentials and who even worked at NATO headquarters and was a contact for Russia's security services did not divulge any secret information that could harm Sweden's security, the country's top military commander...

Former German military translator on trial as Iran spy

Jan. 20, 2020 6:14 AM EST

BERLIN (AP) — A German-Afghan man who worked for years as an interpreter and adviser for the German military went on trial Monday on charges of spying for Iranian intelligence. The 51-year-old man, who has been identified only as Abdul S. in line with German privacy rules, is charged with "a particularly...

FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2019 file photo, Colombia's army commander, Gen. Nicacio Martinez, from left, new Defense Minister Carlos Holmes Trujillo, President Ivan Duque and Armed Forces Commander Gen. Luis Fernando Navarro, review troops during a military ceremony in Bogota, Colombia. In an article published last Sunday, Semana magazine interviewed members of an elite military intelligence unit who say their superiors ordered them to use software and equipment purchased for spying on terrorist groups, to eavesdrop on high-ranking members of the opposition and on a judge who was overseeing a witness tampering case involving former president Alvaro Uribe. The magazine claims that knowledge of the espionage scandal within some sectors of the government forced the commander of Colombia's army General Nicacio Martinez to resign. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara, File)

Colombian senators seek protection after surveillance report

Jan. 19, 2020 12:16 PM EST

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombian Sen. Antonio Sanguino moves around town in a bullet-proof vehicle, with three pistol-packing bodyguards watching over him as he attends meetings and political rallies. But the leftist senator says that while the bodyguards protect him from assassination attempts, they have...

Mandy Patinkin, left, and Claire Danes participate in the Showtime

'Homeland' star Patinkin lauds intelligence community

Jan. 14, 2020 4:04 PM EST

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — The U.S. intelligence sector has a staunch defender in “Homeland” star Mandy Patinkin. During a panel discussion about the Showtime spy thriller’s final season, Patinkin delivered a passionate speech about the respect he said it deserves and isn't getting from...

Protesters hold banners outside Westminster Magistrates Court in London, where Julian Assange is due to appear, Monday, Jan. 13, 2020. Protesters will be insisting that Assange should not be extradited to the US for his reporting of the Iraq and Afghanistan war. They insist he will not face a fair trial in the United States where the charges against him could result in imprisonment for 175 years. Assange will be transported from Belmarsh high-security prison. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

WikiLeaks' Assange in UK court fighting extradition to USA

Jan. 13, 2020 8:38 AM EST

LONDON (AP) — WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange made a brief court appearance Monday in his bid to prevent extradition to the United States to face serious espionage charges. He and his lawyers complained they weren't being given enough time to meet to plan their battle against U.S. prosecutors seeking to...

Iran drops spy charges against French-Iranian academic

Jan. 7, 2020 12:34 PM EST

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — A researcher with dual French-Iranian nationality held for months in a notorious Tehran prison will not be tried on espionage charges, her lawyer said Tuesday. But she and another French researcher still face other security-related charges. Iranian prosecutors dropped the spying charges...

In this Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019 photo, Giacomo Ziani, the co-founder of the app ToTok, speaks to The Associated Press in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Ziani, whose video and voice calling app is suspected of being a spying tool of the United Arab Emirates, defended his work in an interview with the AP, while denying knowing that people and companies linked to the project had ties to the country's intelligence apparatus. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)

Co-creator defends suspected UAE spying app called ToTok

Jan. 2, 2020 6:29 PM EST

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — If the popular ToTok video and voice calling app is a spying tool of the United Arab Emirates, that’s news to its co-creator. Giacomo Ziani defended his work in an interview with The Associated Press and said he had no knowledge that people and companies linked...

Feds: Chemical engineer at center of industrial espionage

Dec. 23, 2019 2:30 PM EST

MORRISTOWN, Tenn. (AP) — A high-performing, Chinese-born chemical engineer began work at Eastman Chemical Company in Kingsport in September 2017 as the alleged linchpin in a broader industrial-espionage scheme devised to steal tens of millions of dollars worth of trade secrets, proprietary information she...

FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2013 file photo, a worker looks at his mobile phone at the newly opened Al Maktoum International Airport in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. According to a New York Times report, ToTok, a chat app that quickly became popular in the United Arab Emirates for communicating with friends and family, is actually a spying tool used by the government to track its users. (Patrick Castillo/Emarat Al Youm via AP, File)

Report: Popular UAE chat app ToTok a government spy tool

Dec. 23, 2019 1:08 PM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — A chat app that quickly became popular in the United Arab Emirates for communicating with friends and family is actually a spying tool used by the government to track its users, according to a newspaper report. The government uses ToTok to track conversations, locations, images and other...