Latest Water conservation and preservation News

Dry then wet: Everglades birds are in for weak season

May. 30, 2020 3:01 AM EDT

PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Before a surveillance flight to count wading birds around water conservation areas south of Palm Beach, ecologist Mark Cook was hoping to see signs that recent rains in South Florida had replenished the parched marshes, helping to revive shallow pools packed with fish the birds rely...

Dayton man dies in apparent drowning in nature preserve

May. 26, 2020 11:30 AM EDT

YELLOW SPRINGS, Ohio (AP) — An 18-year-old Dayton man died in an apparent drowning in a closed nature preserve in western Ohio, authorities said. However, the cause and manner of Jalynn Henderson's death remain under investigation, according to the Greene County Coroner’s Office. The Miami Township...

Man, 18, dies in apparent drowning in nature preserve

May. 25, 2020 10:54 AM EDT

YELLOW SPRINGS, Ohio (AP) — An 18-year-old died in an apparent drowning in a closed nature preserve in western Ohio, authorities said. The Miami Township Fire-Rescue Department reported getting an emergency call at around 2 p.m. Sunday. A Yellow Springs police officer responded and found the victim in...

Nevada water authority backs out of $15B pipeline project

May. 22, 2020 3:14 PM EDT

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Southern Nevada Water Authority has backed out of a pipeline project designed to pump billions of gallons of water from eastern Nevada to Las Vegas. The authority's board of directors voted unanimously Thursday, ending the state and federal permitting process, including withdrawing...

FILE - In this May 11, 2015, file photo, nuclear waste is stored in underground containers at the Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Scientists say radioactive and chemical contamination in a giant aquifer below an eastern Idaho federal nuclear facility has decreased or remained constant in recent years. A report released earlier this year by the U.S. Geological Survey attributes the decreases to radioactive decay, changes in waste-disposal methods, cleanup efforts and dilution from water coming into the Lake Erie-sized Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer. The contamination originated at an 890-square-mile (2305-square-kilometer) U.S. Department of Energy site that includes the Idaho National Laboratory, considered the nation’s leading nuclear research lab.  (AP Photo/Keith Ridler, File)

Radioactive waste cleanup paying off for giant Idaho aquifer

May. 21, 2020 6:04 PM EDT

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Radioactive and chemical contamination in a giant aquifer below an eastern Idaho federal nuclear facility has decreased or remained constant in recent years, scientists say. A report released earlier this year by the U.S. Geological Survey attributes the decreases to radioactive decay,...

Pritzker activates Guard to help prepare for flooding

May. 21, 2020 12:13 PM EDT

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Gov. J.B. Pritzker has activated nearly 60 Illinois National Guard soldiers and ordered additional steps by the state to prepare for projected flooding along the Illinois River and other streams. The National Weather Service forecasts the Illinois River will reach major flood stage...

FILE - In this April 11, 2018, file photo, water flows through a fish ladder designed to help migrating fish swim through the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River near Almota, Wash. An Environmental Protection Agency report provides details about how federal government dams in the Snake and Columbia river system raise summer water temperatures, hurting endangered salmon runs. The report made public Tuesday, May 19, 2020 said dams on both rivers play a role in raising water temperatures above 68 degrees Fahrenheit, which is the point at which the water becomes harmful to salmon and steelhead. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios, File)

EPA says federal dams raise water temperature in Snake River

May. 20, 2020 2:43 PM EDT

LEWISTON, Idaho (AP) — An Environmental Protection Agency report provides details about how federal government dams in the Snake and Columbia river system raise summer water temperatures, hurting endangered salmon runs. The report made public Tuesday said dams on both rivers play a role in raising water...

Agency puts Colorado lake's purchase high on funding list

May. 18, 2020 4:24 PM EDT

DENVER (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service announced that the purchase of land around Colorado's Sweetwater Lake is among its top 10 acquisition priorities for 2021. The agency's list released last week ranked the purchase in Garfield County ninth among 36 land acquisition projects, The Colorado Sun reports....

FILE - In this March 28, 2005 file photo a sign posted outside a water well indicates perchlorate contamination at the site in Rialto, Calif. The Environmental Protection Agency has said since last year it is considering four options for dealing with perchlorate contamination in drinking water, including not adopting any regulation at all. EPA spokeswoman Corry Schiermeyer denied reports that the Trump administration had decided to go with the do-nothing option. She confirmed, however, that the agency expected to send a recommendation to the White House Office of Management and Budget “shortly.”  (AP Photo/Ric Francis, File)

EPA: Still deciding on contaminant that lowers kids' IQs

May. 14, 2020 6:35 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — An Environmental Protection Agency proposal to drop any federal regulation of a water contaminant shown to damage infant brains would translate to lower IQs and other problems for an unknown number of American babies, pediatrician and public health groups say. The EPA has said since last...

This undated photo provided by Nathan Newcomer shows the Middle Box of the Gila River west of Silver City, N.M. Portions of the Gila River would be designated as “wild and scenic” under legislation unveiled Tuesday, May 12, 2020, by New Mexico Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich. (Nathan Newcomer via AP)

Senators seek to designate Gila River as 'wild and scenic'

May. 12, 2020 1:38 PM EDT

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Portions of the Gila River would be designated as “wild and scenic” under legislation unveiled Tuesday by New Mexico’s two U.S. senators. Spanning parts of New Mexico and Arizona, the river and other main tributaries in the area make up the largest remaining...