Latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention News

FILE - In this June 26, 2020 file photo, a man and his son are silhouetted against the sky as they watch the sunset from a park in Kansas City, Mo. Health experts once thought 2020 might be the worst year yet for a rare paralyzing disease that has been hitting U.S. children for the past decade.  But they now say the coronavirus pandemic could disrupt the pattern for the mysterious illnesses, which spike every other year starting in late summer. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

COVID-19 measures could disrupt rare polio-like disease

Aug. 4, 2020 1:53 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — Health experts once thought 2020 might be the worst year yet for a rare paralyzing disease that has been hitting U.S. children for the past decade. But they now say the coronavirus pandemic could disrupt the pattern for the mysterious illnesses, which spike every other year starting in...

This 2013 photo provided by Roland Mack of District Heights, Md., shows him with his sister, Chantee. In the spring of 2020, Chantee Mack, a 44-year-old disease intervention specialist, lost her life after COVID-19 struck the Prince George’s County Health Department in the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C. (Roland Mack via AP)

County pledges probe into health worker's coronavirus death

Aug. 4, 2020 10:13 AM EDT

Officials in a Maryland county say they “will spare no time or expense” investigating the circumstances surrounding the death of a veteran public health worker who died of COVID-19 after relatives and coworkers believe she contracted the virus on the job. The probe follows a story by Kaiser Health...

FILE - In this Monday, July 27, 2020 file photo, a nurse prepares a shot as a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway in Binghamton, N.Y. Who gets to be first in line for a COVID-19 vaccine? U.S. health authorities hope by late next month to have some draft guidance on how to ration initial doses, but it’s a vexing decision. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)

Debate begins for who's first in line for COVID-19 vaccine

Aug. 2, 2020 7:05 AM EDT

Who gets to be first in line for a COVID-19 vaccine? U.S. health authorities hope by late next month to have some draft guidance on how to ration initial doses, but it’s a vexing decision. “Not everybody’s going to like the answer,” Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National...

FILE - In this June 25, 2020, file photo, a physician assistant prepares to collect a nasal swab sample from a patient for COVID-19 testing at Xpress Urgent Care in Tustin, Calif.  California health officials have reported the state’s first coronavirus death of a child. The state Department of Public Health said Friday, July 31, the victim was a teenager, had other health conditions and died in the Central Valley.  No other details were released. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

California officials report first virus death of a child

Jul. 31, 2020 9:15 PM EDT

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California health officials reported the state’s first coronavirus death of a child on Friday as the statewide tally of fatalities surpassed 9,000, saying the victim was a teenager who had other health conditions. The teenager's death occurred in the Central Valley, but...

FILE - In this Tuesday, July 14, 2020 file photo, a student wearing a mask has his temperature checked by a teacher before entering a school for summer classes in Texas. On Friday, July 31, 2020, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting that infrared thermometers, which are held near the forehead to scan body temperature without direct contact, point an infrared light directly at the brain’s pineal gland, exposing it to harmful radiation. Infrared thermometers don’t emit radiation into the brain; they sense heat emitted by the body. They pose no risk to the pineal gland, which is located deep within the brain, according to Dr. Haris Sair, director of neuroradiology at Johns Hopkins University. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what happened this week

Jul. 31, 2020 3:26 PM EDT

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts: ___ CLAIM: Infrared thermometers, which are held near the forehead to scan body...

Concerns mount over outbreak at immigrant detention center

Jul. 30, 2020 11:35 AM EDT

FARMVILLE, Va. (AP) — Virginia's governor and two U.S. senators urged President Trump to respond to the nation's worst coronavirus outbreak that has occurred inside an immigrant detention center, calling it a “dire situation.” Immigration and Customs Enforcement said 262 undocumented...

Nick Watney smiles after a birdie during the first round of the 3M Open golf tournament in Blaine, Minn., Thursday, July 23, 2020. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton- King)

PGA Tour modifies guidelines for positive coronavirus tests

Jul. 28, 2020 6:50 PM EDT

The PGA Tour enters its eighth week of its return to golf with another modification to its guidelines for positive coronavirus tests and a gradual broadening of who gets to attend tournaments. The updates on the test protocols means the end of grouping players who have recovered from the coronavirus — or...

Gao Fu, the head of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), speaks to journalists after a press conference at the State Council Information Office in Beijing on Jan. 26, 2020. Gao has revealed Tuesday, July 28, 2020 he has been injected with an experimental coronavirus vaccine in what he said is an attempt to persuade the public to follow suit when one is approved. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Head of China CDC gets injected with experimental vaccine

Jul. 28, 2020 2:51 AM EDT

BEIJING (AP) — The head of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention says he has been injected with an experimental coronavirus vaccine in an attempt to persuade the public to follow suit when one is approved. “I’m going to reveal something undercover: I am injected with one of...

FILE - In this Wednesday, March 4, 2020 file photo, Jon Ossoff speaks to the media and supporters after he qualified to run in the Senate race against Republican Sen. David Perdue in Atlanta. The Democratic Senate candidate is in isolation as is his wife, who contracted COVID-19, Ossoff confirmed Saturday, July 25, 2020. (Bob Andres/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

The Latest: Ga. Democratic Senate candidate's wife has virus

Jul. 25, 2020 6:22 PM EDT

ATLANTA -- Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Jon Ossoff says he's in isolation with his wife, who contracted COVID-19. The 33-year-old candidate said his wife, Dr. Alisha Kramer, has mild coronavirus symptoms and that he’s showing symptoms, too. He said he was tested Saturday and is awaiting results...

Healthcare worker Rahaana Smith instructs passengers how to use a nasal swab, Friday, July 24, 2020, at a drive-thru COVID-19 testing site at the Miami-Dade County Auditorium, in Miami. Florida has experienced a sharp increase in coronavirus deaths over the past two weeks, including another 136 recorded Friday as the state's total confirmed cases topped 400,000. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

US agency vows steps to address COVID-19 inequalities

Jul. 25, 2020 9:10 AM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — If Black, Hispanic and Native Americans are hospitalized and killed by the coronavirus at far higher rates than others, shouldn't the government count them as high risk for serious illness? That seemingly simple question has been mulled by federal health officials for months. And so far the...