Latest Environmental science News

Students to study economic impact of Fall River Vietnam wall

Feb. 15, 2020 2:44 PM EST

FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) — A group of college students has launched a project to study the potential economic impact of the soon-to-open Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Fall River. Joseph Marshall, committee chairman of the group raising the wall, tells The Herald News the students from Salve Regina...

Ecologists hail freezing of funds for new Polish coal plant

Feb. 14, 2020 10:41 AM EST

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — A European group fighting climate change on Friday hailed the decision by two Polish energy companies to suspend financing for the construction of a new coal power plant. Climate Action network said suspension of funding for the Ostroleka C plant in eastern Poland should lead to the...

In this photo taken Monday, Oct. 1, 2018, residents stand by the side of the road after fetching water, between Melut and Paloch town, in South Sudan. The oil industry in South Sudan has left a landscape pocked with hundreds of open waste pits with the water and soil contaminated with toxic chemicals and heavy metals, and accounts of

South Sudan ignores reports on oil pollution, birth defects

Feb. 14, 2020 3:10 AM EST

PALOCH, South Sudan (AP) — The oil industry in South Sudan has left a landscape pocked with hundreds of open waste pits, the water and soil contaminated with toxic chemicals and heavy metals including mercury, manganese, and arsenic, according to four environmental reports obtained by The Associated Press....

Maryland Senate OKs ban on releasing balloons into the sky

Feb. 12, 2020 5:30 PM EST

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — The Maryland Senate has approved a measure that would create a statewide ban on the intentional release of balloons into the atmosphere. The Senate voted 38-8 on Tuesday for the measure. The bill creates a civil penalty of up to $250 per violation by an organization or a person who is...

In this June 17, 2011, photo provided by NOAA Fisheries are freshwater seals at Iliamna Lake, in Alaska. An environmental group is petitioning the federal government to list a population of freshwater Alaska seals under the Endangered Species Act. The Center for Biological Diversity on Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, petitioned to provide protections to harbor seals that live at Iliamna Lake in southwest Alaska. (Dave Withrow/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

Group seeks endangered species listing for Alaska lake seals

Feb. 6, 2020 7:42 PM EST

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The only known freshwater harbor seals in the U.S. should be listed as threatened or endangered, an environmental group said Thursday in its second petition for the animals. The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned for additional protections for the 400 harbor seals that...

Manufacturer to stop making pesticide linked to brain damage

Feb. 6, 2020 7:04 PM EST

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — The manufacturer of a commonly used pesticide that has been linked to brain damage in children will stop making the chemical this year. Corteva Inc. said Thursday that it will end production of chlorpyrifos by the end of this year. It cited shrinking demand and withering sales for...

In this Jan. 11, 2020 photo a man photographs waves crashing onto the cliffs at Rodea Point in Lincoln County, Ore. during an extreme high tide that coincided with a big winter storm. Amateur scientists are whipping out their smartphones to document the effects of extreme high tides on shore lines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels due to climate change will mean for coastal communities around the world. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

Photos of 'king tides' globally show risks of climate change

Feb. 5, 2020 1:02 PM EST

DEPOE BAY, Ore. (AP) — Tourists, nature lovers and amateur scientists are whipping out their cameras to document the effects of extreme high tides on shorelines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels will mean for coastal communities around...

In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)

Scientists dive into 'Midnight Zone' to study dark ocean

Feb. 5, 2020 12:37 PM EST

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of...

Grant to fund child exploitation research

Jan. 25, 2020 10:00 AM EST

DURHAM, N.H. (AP) — University of New Hampshire researchers are getting a four-year grant to track trends in the use of technology to sexually exploit children. The National Institute of Justice grant will fund the fourth in a series of studies conducted by the university's Crimes Against Children Research...

Crab larvae suffering shell damage from ocean acidification

Jan. 24, 2020 10:34 AM EST

SEATTLE (AP) — Ocean acidification is damaging the shells of young Dungeness crab in the Pacific Northwest, an impact that scientists did not expect until much later this century, according to new research. A study released in the journal Science of the Total Environment this week is based on a 2016 survey...