Latest U.S. Environmental Protection Agency News

FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2017, file photo, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Building is shown in Washington. Six former Environmental Protection Agency chiefs are calling for an agency reset after President Donald Trump’s regulation-chopping, industry-minded first term. The group is presenting a detailed action plan drafted by former EPA staffers for whoever wins the Nov. 3 presidential election.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

6 former EPA bosses call for agency reset after election

Aug. 12, 2020 10:26 AM EDT

Six former Environmental Protection Agency chiefs are calling for an agency reset after President Donald Trump’s regulation-chopping, industry-minded first term, backing a detailed plan by former EPA staffers that ranges from renouncing political influence in regulation to boosting climate-friendly...

Western Nebraska man gets prison for dumping hazardous waste

Aug. 11, 2020 1:47 PM EDT

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A western Nebraska man has been sentenced to nearly three years in federal prison for illegally dumping hazardous waste at sites around south-central Nebraska. Edward Miller, 44, was a resident of Sidney in October 2017 when he loaded a truck and flatbed trailer with pesticides and...

EPA, U of I develop school course on food waste

Aug. 10, 2020 7:43 AM EDT

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has worked with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to create an educational unit on food waste. “Where Does my Food Go?” is for fifth- and sixth-graders and helps them understand the implications of thrown-out...

Chili Yazzie, the Navajo Nation's Shiprock Chapter president, holds a tomato he just picked from his garden on July 22, 2020 in Shiprock, N.M. Five years after U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contractors breached a mine tunnel at the abandoned Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colorado, the Navajo Nation is still feeling the effects. (Anthony Jackson/The Albuquerque Journal via AP)

Gold King mine spill left linger troubles on Navajo Nation

Aug. 8, 2020 11:01 AM EDT

SHIPROCK, N.M. (AP) — Duane “Chili” Yazzie wears a “Water is Life” shirt as he walks the rows of his farm. He speaks of the river and earth as sacred entities for the Navajo people. But the Shiprock Chapter president can’t forget when the river turned yellow. On Aug. 5,...

EPA to help with university's Casco Bay preservation effort

Aug. 8, 2020 9:09 AM EDT

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded a Maine university more than $650,000 to support a water conservation effort in Casco Bay. The EPA is giving the money to the University of Southern Maine in support of the university's Casco Bay Estuary Partnership and its...

FILE - In this Aug. 12, 2015 file photo, water flows through a series of retention ponds built to contain and filter out heavy metals and chemicals from the Gold King Mine. The U.S. government settled a lawsuit Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020, brought by the state of Utah over a mine waste spill caused by federal workers that sent wastewater downstream to several states from the inactive Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado five years ago. The Environmental Protection Agency agreed to fund $3 million in Utah clean water projects and give another $360 million to the state for remediation projects at abandoned mine sites. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

EPA settles with Utah over 2015 Colorado mine spill

Aug. 6, 2020 7:44 PM EDT

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government settled a lawsuit Wednesday brought by the state of Utah over a mine waste spill caused by federal workers that sent wastewater downstream to several states from the inactive Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado five years ago. The Environmental Protection...

FILE - In this July 26, 2020, file photo, federal officers launch tear gas at demonstrators during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse in Portland, Ore. The Associated Press found that there is no government oversight of the manufacture and use of tear gas. Instead, the industry is left to regulate itself. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Lack of study and oversight raises concerns about tear gas

Aug. 6, 2020 11:41 AM EDT

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On June 2, Justin LaFrancois attended a protest against police violence and racism in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, where he planned to livestream the event for his alternative newspaper’s website. Shortly into the march, police, who reported that water bottles and rocks...

FILE - This April 18, 2013 aerial file photo, shows the remains of a nursing home, left, apartment complex, center, and fertilizer plant, right, destroyed by an explosion at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas. Images of a massive explosion in the Lebanese capital looked depressingly familiar to West, Texas Mayor Tommy, whose small town in 2013 was partly leveled by one of the deadliest fertilizer plant explosions in U.S. history.

'We don't seem to learn': Beirut explosion echoes US tragedy

Aug. 6, 2020 12:21 AM EDT

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The staggering videos from the Lebanese capital are grimly familiar to Tommy Muska thousands of miles away in Texas: a towering blast, a thundering explosion and shock waves demolishing buildings with horrifying speed. It is what the mayor of West, Texas, lived seven years ago when...

President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing with reporters in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020, in Washington. Trump said Wednesday he would

Trump says he'll listen to both sides on Alaska mine project

Aug. 5, 2020 8:58 PM EDT

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — President Donald Trump said Wednesday he would “listen to both sides” after his eldest son and a campaign adviser urged him to intervene to block a proposed copper and gold mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region. Donald Trump Jr. on Tuesday agreed with a tweet from...

FILE - This April 18, 2013 aerial file photo, shows the remains of a nursing home, left, apartment complex, center, and fertilizer plant, right, destroyed by an explosion at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas. Images of a massive explosion in the Lebanese capital looked depressingly familiar to West, Texas Mayor Tommy, whose small town in 2013 was partly leveled by one of the deadliest fertilizer plant explosions in U.S. history.

'We don't seem to learn': Beirut explosion echoes US tragedy

Aug. 5, 2020 6:27 PM EDT

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The staggering videos from the Lebanese capital are grimly familiar to Tommy Muska thousands of miles away in Texas: a towering blast, a thundering explosion and shock waves demolishing buildings with horrifying speed. It is what the mayor of West, Texas, lived seven years ago when...